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Considerado o contexto, o termo “far”, na expressão - FUVEST 2024

Inglês - 2024

Over the last two decades, technology companies and policymakers warned of a “digital divide” in which poor children could fall behind their more affluent peers without equal access to technology. Today, with widespread internet access and smartphone ownership, the gap has narrowed sharply.
But with less fanfare a different division has appeared: Across the country, poor children and adolescents are participating far less in sports and fitness activities than more affluent youngsters are. Call it the physical divide. Data from multiple sources reveal a significant gap in sports participation by income level.
A combination of factors is responsible. Spending cuts and changing priorities at some public schools have curtailed physical education classes and organized sports. At the same time, privatized youth sports have become a multibilliondollar enterprise offering new opportunities — at least for families that can afford hundreds to thousands of dollars each season for club-team fees, uniforms, equipment, travel to tournaments and private coaching.
“What’s happened as sports has become privatized is that it has become the haves and have-nots,” said Jon Solomon, editorial director for the Aspen Institute Sports and Society Program. “Particularly for low-income kids, if they don’t have access to sports within the school setting, where are they going to get their physical activity?” Mr. Solomon said. “The answer is nowhere.”

The main players in the Spanish–Aztec War (1519–21) are - FUVEST 2024

Inglês - 2024

The main players in the Spanish–Aztec War (1519–21) are well known: Hernán Cortés and Montezuma. Lesser-known, though no less important, is a multilingual exiled Aztec woman who was enslaved, then served as a guide and interpreter, then became Cortés’s mistress. She was known as Doña Marina, and as La Malinche.
Scholar and researcher Cordelia Candelaria writes: her paramount value to the Spaniards was not merely linguistic. She was an interpreter/liaison who served as a guide to the region, as an advisor on native customs and beliefs, and as a strategist.
La Malinche was the daughter of an Aztec cacique (chief). This gave her an unusual level of education, which she would later leverage as a guide and interpreter for the Spanish. Throughout Cortés’s travels, she became indispensable as a translator, not only capable of functionally translating from one language to the other, but of speaking compellingly, strategizing, and forging political connections.
Integral as she was to Spain’s success, La Malinche is a controversial figure. Candelaria quotes T. R. Fehrenbach as saying, “If there is one villainess in Mexican history, she is La Malinche. She was to become the ethnic traitress supreme.” But Candelaria argues that La Malinche’s act of turning her back on her own people makes more psychological sense when we consider that, at a young age, she had been sold by her own mother into slavery. Candelaria asks, “What else could this outcast from the Aztecs, ‘her own people,’ have done?”

Analise o meme publicado pelo perfil “Classical Damn” no - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Analise o meme publicado pelo perfil “Classical Damn” no Instagram em 02.07.2021.

Questão 09 - UNESP 2024

The text and the graph are mainly about the (A) decline - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia o texto e examine o gráfico para responder à questão:

UNESP 2024

The first Game Developers Conference, in 1988, attracted 25 participants and took place in a programmer’s sitting room in California. This 2023 summit, which began on March 20 in a giant exhibition centre in San Francisco, demonstrates how the industry has grown. Some 3.2 billion people now play, thanks largely to the spread of the smartphone. Women are now almost as likely as men to call themselves gamers. Gaming is catching on among all age groups. In Britain, for instance, half of those aged 55-64 play video games, though for less time than the young. Worldwide there are now more console owners aged 35-44 than 16-24.
The bigger the audience, the bigger the market. Consumers will spend 185 billion dollars on games in 2023, more than half on mobile games. That is about five times the value of the cinema box office, and two-thirds more than the video-streaming business. As gaming continues to grow, it is beginning to rival television as the world’s favourite entertainment medium.

UNESP 2024

According to the first paragraph, the Game Developers - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia o texto e examine o gráfico para responder à questão:

UNESP 2024

The first Game Developers Conference, in 1988, attracted 25 participants and took place in a programmer’s sitting room in California. This 2023 summit, which began on March 20 in a giant exhibition centre in San Francisco, demonstrates how the industry has grown. Some 3.2 billion people now play, thanks largely to the spread of the smartphone. Women are now almost as likely as men to call themselves gamers. Gaming is catching on among all age groups. In Britain, for instance, half of those aged 55-64 play video games, though for less time than the young. Worldwide there are now more console owners aged 35-44 than 16-24.
The bigger the audience, the bigger the market. Consumers will spend 185 billion dollars on games in 2023, more than half on mobile games. That is about five times the value of the cinema box office, and two-thirds more than the video-streaming business. As gaming continues to grow, it is beginning to rival television as the world’s favourite entertainment medium.

UNESP 2024

Uma interpretação matemática plausível da frase do - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia o texto e examine o gráfico para responder à questão:

UNESP 2024

The first Game Developers Conference, in 1988, attracted 25 participants and took place in a programmer’s sitting room in California. This 2023 summit, which began on March 20 in a giant exhibition centre in San Francisco, demonstrates how the industry has grown. Some 3.2 billion people now play, thanks largely to the spread of the smartphone. Women are now almost as likely as men to call themselves gamers. Gaming is catching on among all age groups. In Britain, for instance, half of those aged 55-64 play video games, though for less time than the young. Worldwide there are now more console owners aged 35-44 than 16-24.
The bigger the audience, the bigger the market. Consumers will spend 185 billion dollars on games in 2023, more than half on mobile games. That is about five times the value of the cinema box office, and two-thirds more than the video-streaming business. As gaming continues to grow, it is beginning to rival television as the world’s favourite entertainment medium.

UNESP 2024

A frase do texto cujo significado pode ser verificado no - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia o texto e examine o gráfico para responder à questão:

UNESP 2024

The first Game Developers Conference, in 1988, attracted 25 participants and took place in a programmer’s sitting room in California. This 2023 summit, which began on March 20 in a giant exhibition centre in San Francisco, demonstrates how the industry has grown. Some 3.2 billion people now play, thanks largely to the spread of the smartphone. Women are now almost as likely as men to call themselves gamers. Gaming is catching on among all age groups. In Britain, for instance, half of those aged 55-64 play video games, though for less time than the young. Worldwide there are now more console owners aged 35-44 than 16-24.
The bigger the audience, the bigger the market. Consumers will spend 185 billion dollars on games in 2023, more than half on mobile games. That is about five times the value of the cinema box office, and two-thirds more than the video-streaming business. As gaming continues to grow, it is beginning to rival television as the world’s favourite entertainment medium.

UNESP 2024

No trecho do segundo parágrafo “As gaming continues to - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia o texto e examine o gráfico para responder à questão:

UNESP 2024

The first Game Developers Conference, in 1988, attracted 25 participants and took place in a programmer’s sitting room in California. This 2023 summit, which began on March 20 in a giant exhibition centre in San Francisco, demonstrates how the industry has grown. Some 3.2 billion people now play, thanks largely to the spread of the smartphone. Women are now almost as likely as men to call themselves gamers. Gaming is catching on among all age groups. In Britain, for instance, half of those aged 55-64 play video games, though for less time than the young. Worldwide there are now more console owners aged 35-44 than 16-24.
The bigger the audience, the bigger the market. Consumers will spend 185 billion dollars on games in 2023, more than half on mobile games. That is about five times the value of the cinema box office, and two-thirds more than the video-streaming business. As gaming continues to grow, it is beginning to rival television as the world’s favourite entertainment medium.

UNESP 2024

From the comic strip, one can say that (A) there is a - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia a tira de Bill Amend para responder à questão

No primeiro quadrinho, a fala “Is she out of her mind?!” - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia a tira de Bill Amend para responder à questão

No terceiro quadrinho, o termo “that” refere-se a - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Leia a tira de Bill Amend para responder à questão

The benefits of computer games in education are clear. - UNESP 2024

Inglês - 2024

Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul

The benefits of computer games in education are clear. They engage students, improve problem-solving skills, enhance creativity and imagination, allow for personalized learning, remote learning, learning on demand, and contacting peers around the world. With the increasing use of technology in schools, it is essential that teachers explore the potential benefits of computer games and incorporate them into their teaching methods. Doing so can create a more engaging and effective learning environment for their students.

No anúncio, o segmento “won’t bestow mega-buck prices” - FUVEST 2024

Inglês - 2024

Questão 4 - FUVEST 2024

Considerado o contexto, a expressão “be worth” tem - FUVEST 2024

Inglês - 2024

Questão 5 - FUVEST 2023 - Caderno Azul

De acordo com o texto, muitos visitantes das exposições - FUVEST 2024

Inglês - 2024

Vincent van Gogh. Salvador Dalí. Frida Kahlo. Casual perusers of ads everywhere would be forgiven for thinking that art galleries are enjoying some sort of golden age. The truth is less exciting, more expensive and certainly more depressing. For this is no ordinary art on offer; this art is “immersive”, the latest lovechild of TikTok and enterprising warehouse landlords. The first problem with immersive art? It's not actually very immersive. A common trope of “immersive” retrospectives is to recreate original pieces using gimmicky tech. But merely aiming a projector at a blank canvas doesn’t do much in the way of sensory stimulation. My favourite element of an “immersive” show I have been to was their faithful recreation of Van Gogh’s bedroom. An ambitious feat, executed with some furniture and, of course, mutilated pastiches of his paintings. While projectors, surround sound and uncomfortably wacky seating are mainstays of immersive art, there are also the VR headsets. But many exhibitions don’t even include these with the standard ticket, so my return to reality has twice been accompanied by an usher brandishing a credit card machine. Sometimes these installations are so banal and depthless, visitors have often walked through installations entirely oblivious to whatever is happening around them. Despite the fixation “immersive experiences” have with novelty, the products of their labours are remarkably similar: disappointing light shows punctuated by a few gamified set pieces.

Human beings are relentlessly capable of reflecting on - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Human beings are relentlessly capable of reflecting on themselves. We might do something out of habit, but then we can begin to reflect on the habit. We can habitually think things, and then reflect on what we are thinking. We can ask ourselves (or sometimes we get asked by other people) whether we know what we are talking about. To answer that we need to reflect on our own positions, our own understanding of what we are saying, our own sources of authority. Cosmologists have to pause from solving mathematical equations with the letter t in them, and ask what is meant, for instance, by the flow of time or the direction of time or the beginning of time. But at that point, whether they recognize it or not, they become philosophers.

The main purpose of the text is to reveal why a) wealthy - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 16.

Daters are astonished by the high prices of wining and dining a romantic interest with inflation at its highest rate in over 40 years. The consumer price index category for food away from home rose 7.7% in June 2022 from a year earlier, while full-service restaurants climbed 8.9%. For those testing the waters with a cocktail or two, prices for alcoholic beverages rose by 4%.
Those searching for love say they’re feeling the pain. Among 3,000 users on the popular dating app Hinge, almost 41% said they were more concerned with the cost of dates now versus a year ago, with Generation Z respondents more likely to feel the pressure. Emily Derby, a 27-year-old in Tulsa, Oklahoma, said her dating costs have doubled from $200 to $400 a month.
As costs escalate, some singles are scaling back and being more selective about the dates they’re going on, while others are pausing their search for “the one” entirely. On dating site OKCupid, 34% of 70,000 users reported that inflation was impacting their love life. “In the fall of 2020, I was going on dates left and right not really thinking about the costs,” said Seth Rosenberg, a 25-year-old in Philadelphia. “Now, it’s harder to be excited because if a date goes bad, you’re out anywhere from $50 to $100.”
Those still in the dating game have both love and money on the mind. New York City-based dating coach Amy Nobile said even her wealthy clients, many of whom pay $15,000 for a four-month program, are trying to cut their dating costs in half. Clients who would typically spend as much as $150 on a date are seeing if they can get away with $75 or less.
“People are feeling rising prices,” she said. “For those in the long game to find a partner, they feel like they really need to monitor their money flow in the dating world.” As a result, people are on the hunt for less expensive options, said Logan Ury, director of relationship science at Hinge.

(Paulina Cachero. www.bloomberg.com, 21.07.2022. Adaptado.)

No trecho do segundo parágrafo “with Generation Z - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 16.

Daters are astonished by the high prices of wining and dining a romantic interest with inflation at its highest rate in over 40 years. The consumer price index category for food away from home rose 7.7% in June 2022 from a year earlier, while full-service restaurants climbed 8.9%. For those testing the waters with a cocktail or two, prices for alcoholic beverages rose by 4%.
Those searching for love say they’re feeling the pain. Among 3,000 users on the popular dating app Hinge, almost 41% said they were more concerned with the cost of dates now versus a year ago, with Generation Z respondents more likely to feel the pressure. Emily Derby, a 27-year-old in Tulsa, Oklahoma, said her dating costs have doubled from $200 to $400 a month.
As costs escalate, some singles are scaling back and being more selective about the dates they’re going on, while others are pausing their search for “the one” entirely. On dating site OKCupid, 34% of 70,000 users reported that inflation was impacting their love life. “In the fall of 2020, I was going on dates left and right not really thinking about the costs,” said Seth Rosenberg, a 25-year-old in Philadelphia. “Now, it’s harder to be excited because if a date goes bad, you’re out anywhere from $50 to $100.”
Those still in the dating game have both love and money on the mind. New York City-based dating coach Amy Nobile said even her wealthy clients, many of whom pay $15,000 for a four-month program, are trying to cut their dating costs in half. Clients who would typically spend as much as $150 on a date are seeing if they can get away with $75 or less.
“People are feeling rising prices,” she said. “For those in the long game to find a partner, they feel like they really need to monitor their money flow in the dating world.” As a result, people are on the hunt for less expensive options, said Logan Ury, director of relationship science at Hinge.

(Paulina Cachero. www.bloomberg.com, 21.07.2022. Adaptado.)

De acordo com o texto, os estudos sobre as propriedades - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

From French electronic and Japanese indie to K-pop and Spanish jazz, it’s common for people to listen to songs they don’t necessarily understand. Not knowing the language of the lyrics, it seems, doesn’t stop people from liking—and sometimes even singing along to—a song. Unless the listener is looking up the dictionary meaning of the lyrics, then the dictionary meaning of the lyrics doesn’t make or break their appreciation of a song. But why?

“It’s a complicated answer,” said musicologist Lisa Decenteceo, adding that it all starts with what’s called “sound symbolism.” Sound symbolism refers to the study of the relationships between utterances and their meaning. This doesn’t have to do only with music. Marketers, for example, can tune into sound symbolism as part of their strategy in coming up with appealing brand names. In music as well as in branding, Decenteceo explained, there’s something about the appeal of words as sounds, beyond their meaning in a language. While things like culture and personal experiences affect people’s responses to different kinds of music, she explained there are certain musical techniques that are generally used to convey certain moods. One of which is scale. “Songs in a major scale usually have brighter, happier sounds, while minor scales usually have the slightly darker, melancholic feel,” explains Thea Tolentino, a music teacher.

The human brain is wired to respond to sound, she added. In a process called entrainment, the brain “synchronizes our breathing, our movement, even neural activities with the sounds we hear.” This is why fastpaced music is so popular for running, for example, or why some yoga teachers play rhythmic and melodic tracks in their classes. And there are also the things that accompany the words. “Elements of sound and music like pitch, melody, harmony, timbre, and amplitude have an affective, emotional, psychological, cognitive, and even physical impact on listeners. Music adds so much meaning and dimension to texts through a complex of these avenues,” said Decenteceo. What all these things do, she added, is liberate the words. “Song frees the voice from any burden of saying anything meaningful”. It’s important, then, to understand music as a discourse between musical elements. But all in all, Decenteceo said there’s value in whatever immediate appeal people find in the music they listen to, whether or not they understand the words. Music, after all, is the universal language.

According to the text, daters are reassessing their - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 16.

Daters are astonished by the high prices of wining and dining a romantic interest with inflation at its highest rate in over 40 years. The consumer price index category for food away from home rose 7.7% in June 2022 from a year earlier, while full-service restaurants climbed 8.9%. For those testing the waters with a cocktail or two, prices for alcoholic beverages rose by 4%.
Those searching for love say they’re feeling the pain. Among 3,000 users on the popular dating app Hinge, almost 41% said they were more concerned with the cost of dates now versus a year ago, with Generation Z respondents more likely to feel the pressure. Emily Derby, a 27-year-old in Tulsa, Oklahoma, said her dating costs have doubled from $200 to $400 a month.
As costs escalate, some singles are scaling back and being more selective about the dates they’re going on, while others are pausing their search for “the one” entirely. On dating site OKCupid, 34% of 70,000 users reported that inflation was impacting their love life. “In the fall of 2020, I was going on dates left and right not really thinking about the costs,” said Seth Rosenberg, a 25-year-old in Philadelphia. “Now, it’s harder to be excited because if a date goes bad, you’re out anywhere from $50 to $100.”
Those still in the dating game have both love and money on the mind. New York City-based dating coach Amy Nobile said even her wealthy clients, many of whom pay $15,000 for a four-month program, are trying to cut their dating costs in half. Clients who would typically spend as much as $150 on a date are seeing if they can get away with $75 or less.
“People are feeling rising prices,” she said. “For those in the long game to find a partner, they feel like they really need to monitor their money flow in the dating world.” As a result, people are on the hunt for less expensive options, said Logan Ury, director of relationship science at Hinge.

(Paulina Cachero. www.bloomberg.com, 21.07.2022. Adaptado.)

Na frase “there are certain musical techniques that are - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

From French electronic and Japanese indie to K-pop and Spanish jazz, it’s common for people to listen to songs they don’t necessarily understand. Not knowing the language of the lyrics, it seems, doesn’t stop people from liking—and sometimes even singing along to—a song. Unless the listener is looking up the dictionary meaning of the lyrics, then the dictionary meaning of the lyrics doesn’t make or break their appreciation of a song. But why?

“It’s a complicated answer,” said musicologist Lisa Decenteceo, adding that it all starts with what’s called “sound symbolism.” Sound symbolism refers to the study of the relationships between utterances and their meaning. This doesn’t have to do only with music. Marketers, for example, can tune into sound symbolism as part of their strategy in coming up with appealing brand names. In music as well as in branding, Decenteceo explained, there’s something about the appeal of words as sounds, beyond their meaning in a language. While things like culture and personal experiences affect people’s responses to different kinds of music, she explained there are certain musical techniques that are generally used to convey certain moods. One of which is scale. “Songs in a major scale usually have brighter, happier sounds, while minor scales usually have the slightly darker, melancholic feel,” explains Thea Tolentino, a music teacher.

The human brain is wired to respond to sound, she added. In a process called entrainment, the brain “synchronizes our breathing, our movement, even neural activities with the sounds we hear.” This is why fastpaced music is so popular for running, for example, or why some yoga teachers play rhythmic and melodic tracks in their classes. And there are also the things that accompany the words. “Elements of sound and music like pitch, melody, harmony, timbre, and amplitude have an affective, emotional, psychological, cognitive, and even physical impact on listeners. Music adds so much meaning and dimension to texts through a complex of these avenues,” said Decenteceo. What all these things do, she added, is liberate the words. “Song frees the voice from any burden of saying anything meaningful”. It’s important, then, to understand music as a discourse between musical elements. But all in all, Decenteceo said there’s value in whatever immediate appeal people find in the music they listen to, whether or not they understand the words. Music, after all, is the universal language.

In the excerpt from the third paragraph “while others - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 16.

Daters are astonished by the high prices of wining and dining a romantic interest with inflation at its highest rate in over 40 years. The consumer price index category for food away from home rose 7.7% in June 2022 from a year earlier, while full-service restaurants climbed 8.9%. For those testing the waters with a cocktail or two, prices for alcoholic beverages rose by 4%.
Those searching for love say they’re feeling the pain. Among 3,000 users on the popular dating app Hinge, almost 41% said they were more concerned with the cost of dates now versus a year ago, with Generation Z respondents more likely to feel the pressure. Emily Derby, a 27-year-old in Tulsa, Oklahoma, said her dating costs have doubled from $200 to $400 a month.
As costs escalate, some singles are scaling back and being more selective about the dates they’re going on, while others are pausing their search for “the one” entirely. On dating site OKCupid, 34% of 70,000 users reported that inflation was impacting their love life. “In the fall of 2020, I was going on dates left and right not really thinking about the costs,” said Seth Rosenberg, a 25-year-old in Philadelphia. “Now, it’s harder to be excited because if a date goes bad, you’re out anywhere from $50 to $100.”
Those still in the dating game have both love and money on the mind. New York City-based dating coach Amy Nobile said even her wealthy clients, many of whom pay $15,000 for a four-month program, are trying to cut their dating costs in half. Clients who would typically spend as much as $150 on a date are seeing if they can get away with $75 or less.
“People are feeling rising prices,” she said. “For those in the long game to find a partner, they feel like they really need to monitor their money flow in the dating world.” As a result, people are on the hunt for less expensive options, said Logan Ury, director of relationship science at Hinge.

(Paulina Cachero. www.bloomberg.com, 21.07.2022. Adaptado.)

De acordo com o texto, os aspectos físicos relacionados - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

From French electronic and Japanese indie to K-pop and Spanish jazz, it’s common for people to listen to songs they don’t necessarily understand. Not knowing the language of the lyrics, it seems, doesn’t stop people from liking—and sometimes even singing along to—a song. Unless the listener is looking up the dictionary meaning of the lyrics, then the dictionary meaning of the lyrics doesn’t make or break their appreciation of a song. But why?

“It’s a complicated answer,” said musicologist Lisa Decenteceo, adding that it all starts with what’s called “sound symbolism.” Sound symbolism refers to the study of the relationships between utterances and their meaning. This doesn’t have to do only with music. Marketers, for example, can tune into sound symbolism as part of their strategy in coming up with appealing brand names. In music as well as in branding, Decenteceo explained, there’s something about the appeal of words as sounds, beyond their meaning in a language. While things like culture and personal experiences affect people’s responses to different kinds of music, she explained there are certain musical techniques that are generally used to convey certain moods. One of which is scale. “Songs in a major scale usually have brighter, happier sounds, while minor scales usually have the slightly darker, melancholic feel,” explains Thea Tolentino, a music teacher.

The human brain is wired to respond to sound, she added. In a process called entrainment, the brain “synchronizes our breathing, our movement, even neural activities with the sounds we hear.” This is why fastpaced music is so popular for running, for example, or why some yoga teachers play rhythmic and melodic tracks in their classes. And there are also the things that accompany the words. “Elements of sound and music like pitch, melody, harmony, timbre, and amplitude have an affective, emotional, psychological, cognitive, and even physical impact on listeners. Music adds so much meaning and dimension to texts through a complex of these avenues,” said Decenteceo. What all these things do, she added, is liberate the words. “Song frees the voice from any burden of saying anything meaningful”. It’s important, then, to understand music as a discourse between musical elements. But all in all, Decenteceo said there’s value in whatever immediate appeal people find in the music they listen to, whether or not they understand the words. Music, after all, is the universal language.

De acordo com o quarto parágrafo, no outono de 2020 - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 16.

Daters are astonished by the high prices of wining and dining a romantic interest with inflation at its highest rate in over 40 years. The consumer price index category for food away from home rose 7.7% in June 2022 from a year earlier, while full-service restaurants climbed 8.9%. For those testing the waters with a cocktail or two, prices for alcoholic beverages rose by 4%.
Those searching for love say they’re feeling the pain. Among 3,000 users on the popular dating app Hinge, almost 41% said they were more concerned with the cost of dates now versus a year ago, with Generation Z respondents more likely to feel the pressure. Emily Derby, a 27-year-old in Tulsa, Oklahoma, said her dating costs have doubled from $200 to $400 a month.
As costs escalate, some singles are scaling back and being more selective about the dates they’re going on, while others are pausing their search for “the one” entirely. On dating site OKCupid, 34% of 70,000 users reported that inflation was impacting their love life. “In the fall of 2020, I was going on dates left and right not really thinking about the costs,” said Seth Rosenberg, a 25-year-old in Philadelphia. “Now, it’s harder to be excited because if a date goes bad, you’re out anywhere from $50 to $100.”
Those still in the dating game have both love and money on the mind. New York City-based dating coach Amy Nobile said even her wealthy clients, many of whom pay $15,000 for a four-month program, are trying to cut their dating costs in half. Clients who would typically spend as much as $150 on a date are seeing if they can get away with $75 or less.
“People are feeling rising prices,” she said. “For those in the long game to find a partner, they feel like they really need to monitor their money flow in the dating world.” As a result, people are on the hunt for less expensive options, said Logan Ury, director of relationship science at Hinge.

(Paulina Cachero. www.bloomberg.com, 21.07.2022. Adaptado.)

Em relação à compreensão do idioma inglês, o texto - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

Questão 35 - FUVEST 2023

No contexto em que se encontra, o trecho que expressa - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 16.

Daters are astonished by the high prices of wining and dining a romantic interest with inflation at its highest rate in over 40 years. The consumer price index category for food away from home rose 7.7% in June 2022 from a year earlier, while full-service restaurants climbed 8.9%. For those testing the waters with a cocktail or two, prices for alcoholic beverages rose by 4%.
Those searching for love say they’re feeling the pain. Among 3,000 users on the popular dating app Hinge, almost 41% said they were more concerned with the cost of dates now versus a year ago, with Generation Z respondents more likely to feel the pressure. Emily Derby, a 27-year-old in Tulsa, Oklahoma, said her dating costs have doubled from $200 to $400 a month.
As costs escalate, some singles are scaling back and being more selective about the dates they’re going on, while others are pausing their search for “the one” entirely. On dating site OKCupid, 34% of 70,000 users reported that inflation was impacting their love life. “In the fall of 2020, I was going on dates left and right not really thinking about the costs,” said Seth Rosenberg, a 25-year-old in Philadelphia. “Now, it’s harder to be excited because if a date goes bad, you’re out anywhere from $50 to $100.”
Those still in the dating game have both love and money on the mind. New York City-based dating coach Amy Nobile said even her wealthy clients, many of whom pay $15,000 for a four-month program, are trying to cut their dating costs in half. Clients who would typically spend as much as $150 on a date are seeing if they can get away with $75 or less.
“People are feeling rising prices,” she said. “For those in the long game to find a partner, they feel like they really need to monitor their money flow in the dating world.” As a result, people are on the hunt for less expensive options, said Logan Ury, director of relationship science at Hinge.

(Paulina Cachero. www.bloomberg.com, 21.07.2022. Adaptado.)

According to the poster, the #stillme campaign intends - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o pôster de uma campanha do grupo “Dementia Together Northern Ireland” para responder às questões de 17 a 19.

FAMERP 2023

No título do pôster “I have dementia but I’m still me”, - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o pôster de uma campanha do grupo “Dementia Together Northern Ireland” para responder às questões de 17 a 19.

FAMERP 2023

In the excerpt “you can help to support them”, the - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o pôster de uma campanha do grupo “Dementia Together Northern Ireland” para responder às questões de 17 a 19.

FAMERP 2023

A reflexão provocada pela tirinha é comprovada pela - FAMERP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia a tirinha.

FAMERP 2023

Os textos A e B são postagens no perfil do The New York - UNICAMP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Os textos A e B são postagens no perfil do The New York Times na rede social Instagram.

Texto A

UNICAMP 2023

Texto B

UNICAMP 2023

Leia um trecho de um romance publicado em 1985. But if - UNICAMP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia um trecho de um romance publicado em 1985.

But if you happen to be a man sometime in the future, and you’ve made it this far, please remember you will never be subject to the temptation or feeling you must forgive, a man, as a woman. But remember that forgiveness too is a power. To beg for it is a power, and to withhold or bestow it is a power, perhaps the greatest. Maybe none of this is about control. Maybe it isn’t really about who can own whom, who can do what to whom and get away with it, even as far as death. Maybe it isn’t about who can sit and who has to kneel or stand or lie down (…). Maybe it’s about who can do what to whom and be forgiven for it. Never tell me it amounts to the same thing.

O texto a seguir focaliza o termo “audism”, que pode - UNICAMP 2023

Inglês - 2023

O texto a seguir focaliza o termo “audism”, que pode ser traduzido para o português como “ouvintismo”.


Audism is an attitude based on thinking that results in a negative stigma toward anyone who does not hear. Like racism or sexism, audism judges, labels, and limits individuals based on whether a person hears and speaks. Audism reflects the medical view of deafness as a disability that must be fixed. It is rooted in the historical belief that deaf people were savages without language. Because many deaf people grew up in hearing families who did not learn to sign, audism may be ingrained.

Audism occurs when one:
— Asks a deaf person to read your lips or write when s/he has indicated this isn’t preferred.
— Asks a deaf person to “tone down” their facial expressions because they make others uncomfortable.
— Devotes a significant amount of instructional time for a deaf child to lipreading and speech therapy, rather than educational subjects.

Segundo o Texto 1, é correto afirmar que a arte de rua - UNICAMP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Texto 1

In history, the rise of street art around the world has mirrored multiple waves of political unrest. The use of this avantgarde art style for political activism has spread to the Bay Area, California. As an influx of white upper-class residents displaced low-income households, the anger of local people fueled a movement to take back the streets via spray paint, video projections, stenciling — any street art medium. Bay Area activists are weaponizing street art to unite the masses and reclaim their communities’ stolen narratives, re-imagining better futures alongside comrades across the nation. Their freeing and colorful art combats the virulent systems of oppression that white supremacy has entrenched in our society, those same systems which mark their craft as illegal under the guise of vandalism. Street art democratizes public spaces and takes back the streets as effectively as physical protests. As a street artist, Nancypili Hernandez says that her art transforms “locations that feel like a parking lot or private property, to feeling like a collective community commons.”

(Adaptado de: https://harvardpolitics.com/street-art-activism/. Acesso em 20/06/2022.)


Texto 2

UNICAMP 2023

Considerando os Textos 1 e 2, assinale a alternativa - UNICAMP 2023

Inglês - 2023

Texto 1

In history, the rise of street art around the world has mirrored multiple waves of political unrest. The use of this avantgarde art style for political activism has spread to the Bay Area, California. As an influx of white upper-class residents displaced low-income households, the anger of local people fueled a movement to take back the streets via spray paint, video projections, stenciling — any street art medium. Bay Area activists are weaponizing street art to unite the masses and reclaim their communities’ stolen narratives, re-imagining better futures alongside comrades across the nation. Their freeing and colorful art combats the virulent systems of oppression that white supremacy has entrenched in our society, those same systems which mark their craft as illegal under the guise of vandalism. Street art democratizes public spaces and takes back the streets as effectively as physical protests. As a street artist, Nancypili Hernandez says that her art transforms “locations that feel like a parking lot or private property, to feeling like a collective community commons.”

(Adaptado de: https://harvardpolitics.com/street-art-activism/. Acesso em 20/06/2022.)


Texto 2

UNICAMP 2023

COVID AND SMELL LOSS: SOME ANSWERS EMERGE Researchers - UNICAMP 2023

Inglês - 2023

COVID AND SMELL LOSS: SOME ANSWERS EMERGE

Researchers are making headway in understanding how coronavirus causes loss of smell. Several potential treatments to tackle the condition are undergoing clinical trials, including steroids and blood plasma. Recently, a study surveyed 616,318 people in the United States who have had COVID-19. It found that, compared with those who had been infected with the original virus, people who had contracted the Alpha variant were 50% as likely to have chemosensory disruption. This probability fell to 44% for the Delta variant, and to 17% for Omicron. However, a significant portion of people infected early in the pandemic still experience chemosensory effects. A 2021 study followed 100 people who had had mild cases of COVID-19 and 100 people who repeatedly tested negative. More than a year after their infections, 46% of those who had had COVID-19 still had smell problems; by contrast, just 10% of the control group had developed some smell loss, but for other reasons. Furthermore, 7% of those who had been infected still had total smell loss, or ‘anosmia’, at the end of the year. Given that more than 500 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed worldwide, tens of millions of people probably have lingering smell problems.

O Coronavirus Resource Center (CRC) da Johns Hopkins - UNICAMP 2023

Inglês - 2023

O Coronavirus Resource Center (CRC) da Johns Hopkins University é uma importante plataforma de dados sobre a COVID-19, com atualizações frequentes sobre a evolução da pandemia. Os gráficos apresentados nas alternativas que respondem a esta questão foram retirados desta plataforma.
Considere, agora, o contexto fictício de uma palestra ministrada em uma universidade estrangeira por um pesquisador brasileiro. Na ocasião, o cientista fez comentários sobre a situação da pandemia no Brasil, valendo-se de dados da plataforma do CRC:

“As I speak now, in June of 2022, I can say we’ve had a tough time during these past two years in our country. This chart, indicating the number of daily deaths over time, shows how we’ve had a couple of months during the pandemic in which the number of daily deaths was over two thousand.
Despite having the number of deaths spike to 3 thousand last year – our highest peak to date – levels had been steadily decreasing ever since. This year, though, there was a slight increase in the number of daily deaths, which nearly reached levels attained towards the beginning of the pandemic.”

No texto, a expressão “dark doldrums” descreve - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

The expression “dark doldrums” chills the hearts of renewable-energy engineers, who use it to refer to the lulls when solar panels and wind turbines are thwarted by clouds, night, or still air. On a bright, cloudless day, a solar farm can generate prodigious amounts of electricity. But at night solar cells do little, and in calm air turbines sit useless.
The dark doldrums make it difficult for us to rely totally on renewable energy. Power companies need to plan not just for individual storms or windless nights but for difficulties that can stretch for days. Last year, Europe experienced a weekslong “wind drought,” and in 2006 Hawaii endured six weeks of consecutive rainy days. On a smaller scale, communities that want to go allrenewable need to fill the gaps. The obvious solution is batteries, which power everything from mobile phones to electric vehicles; they are relatively inexpensive to make and getting cheaper. But typical models exhaust their stored energy after only three or four hours of maximum output, and—as every smartphone owner knows—their capacity dwindles with each recharge. Moreover, it is expensive to collect enough batteries to cover longer discharges.
We already have one kind of renewable energy storage: more than ninety per cent of the world’s energy-storage capacity is in reservoirs, as part of a technology called pumped-storage hydropower, used to smooth out sharp increases in electricity demand. Motors pump water uphill from a river or a reservoir to a higher reservoir; when the water is released downhill, it spins a turbine, generating power. A pumped-hydro installation is like a giant, permanent battery, charged when water is pumped uphill and depleted as it flows down. Some countries are expanding their use of pumped hydro, but the right geography is hard to find, permits are difficult to obtain, and construction is slow and expensive. The hunt is on for new approaches to energy storage.

Na frase “But typical models exhaust their stored energy - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

The expression “dark doldrums” chills the hearts of renewable-energy engineers, who use it to refer to the lulls when solar panels and wind turbines are thwarted by clouds, night, or still air. On a bright, cloudless day, a solar farm can generate prodigious amounts of electricity. But at night solar cells do little, and in calm air turbines sit useless.
The dark doldrums make it difficult for us to rely totally on renewable energy. Power companies need to plan not just for individual storms or windless nights but for difficulties that can stretch for days. Last year, Europe experienced a weekslong “wind drought,” and in 2006 Hawaii endured six weeks of consecutive rainy days. On a smaller scale, communities that want to go allrenewable need to fill the gaps. The obvious solution is batteries, which power everything from mobile phones to electric vehicles; they are relatively inexpensive to make and getting cheaper. But typical models exhaust their stored energy after only three or four hours of maximum output, and—as every smartphone owner knows—their capacity dwindles with each recharge. Moreover, it is expensive to collect enough batteries to cover longer discharges.
We already have one kind of renewable energy storage: more than ninety per cent of the world’s energy-storage capacity is in reservoirs, as part of a technology called pumped-storage hydropower, used to smooth out sharp increases in electricity demand. Motors pump water uphill from a river or a reservoir to a higher reservoir; when the water is released downhill, it spins a turbine, generating power. A pumped-hydro installation is like a giant, permanent battery, charged when water is pumped uphill and depleted as it flows down. Some countries are expanding their use of pumped hydro, but the right geography is hard to find, permits are difficult to obtain, and construction is slow and expensive. The hunt is on for new approaches to energy storage.

Segundo o texto, quando a geração de energia por células - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

The expression “dark doldrums” chills the hearts of renewable-energy engineers, who use it to refer to the lulls when solar panels and wind turbines are thwarted by clouds, night, or still air. On a bright, cloudless day, a solar farm can generate prodigious amounts of electricity. But at night solar cells do little, and in calm air turbines sit useless.
The dark doldrums make it difficult for us to rely totally on renewable energy. Power companies need to plan not just for individual storms or windless nights but for difficulties that can stretch for days. Last year, Europe experienced a weekslong “wind drought,” and in 2006 Hawaii endured six weeks of consecutive rainy days. On a smaller scale, communities that want to go allrenewable need to fill the gaps. The obvious solution is batteries, which power everything from mobile phones to electric vehicles; they are relatively inexpensive to make and getting cheaper. But typical models exhaust their stored energy after only three or four hours of maximum output, and—as every smartphone owner knows—their capacity dwindles with each recharge. Moreover, it is expensive to collect enough batteries to cover longer discharges.
We already have one kind of renewable energy storage: more than ninety per cent of the world’s energy-storage capacity is in reservoirs, as part of a technology called pumped-storage hydropower, used to smooth out sharp increases in electricity demand. Motors pump water uphill from a river or a reservoir to a higher reservoir; when the water is released downhill, it spins a turbine, generating power. A pumped-hydro installation is like a giant, permanent battery, charged when water is pumped uphill and depleted as it flows down. Some countries are expanding their use of pumped hydro, but the right geography is hard to find, permits are difficult to obtain, and construction is slow and expensive. The hunt is on for new approaches to energy storage.

No meme, a inadequação da resposta à questão - FUVEST 2023

Inglês - 2023

FUVEST 2023

According to the fourth paragraph, (A) roads are in such - FGV 2014

Inglês - 2023

Read the article and answer the question

The road to hell

(1) Bringing crops from one of the futuristic new farms in Brazil’s central and northern plains to foreign markets means taking a journey back in time. Loaded onto lorries, most are driven almost 2,000km south on narrow, potholed roads to the ports of Santos and Paranaguá. In the 19th and early 20th centuries they were used to bring in immigrants and ship out the coffee grown in the fertile states of São Paulo and Paraná, but now they are overwhelmed. Thanks to a record harvest this year, Brazil became the world’s largest soya producer, overtaking the United States. The queue of lorries waiting to enter Santos sometimes stretched to 40km.

(2) No part of that journey makes sense. Brazil has too few crop silos, so lorries are used for storage as well as transport, causing a crush at ports after harvest. Produce from so far north should probably not be travelling to southern ports at all. Freight by road costs twice as much as by rail and four times as much as by water. Brazilian farmers pay 25% or more of the value of their soya to bring it to port; their competitors in Iowa just 9%. The bottleneck at ports pushes costs higher still. It also puts off customers. In March Sunrise Group, China’s biggest soya trader, cancelled an order for 2m tonnes of Brazilian soya after repeated delays.

(3) All of Brazil’s infrastructure is decrepit. The World Economic Forum ranks it at 114th out of 148 countries. After a spate of railway-building at the turn of the 20th century, and road- and dam-building 50 years later, little was added or even maintained. In the 1980s infrastructure was a casualty of slowing growth and spiralling inflation. Unable to find jobs, engineers emigrated or retrained. Government stopped planning for the long term. According to Contas Abertas, a public-spending watchdog, only a fifth of federal money budgeted for urban transport in the past decade was actually spent. Just 1.5% of Brazil’s GDP goes on infrastructure investment from all sources, both public and private. The long-run global average is 3.8%. The McKinsey Global Institute estimates the total value of Brazil’s infrastructure at 16% of GDP. Other big economies average 71%. To catch up, Brazil would have to triple its annual infrastructure spending for the next 20 years.

(4) Moreover, it may be getting poor value from what little it does invest because so much goes on the wrong things. A cumbersome environmental-licensing process pushes up costs and causes delays. Expensive studies are required before construction on big projects can start and then again at various stages along the way and at the end. Farmers and manufacturers spend heavily on lorries because road transport is their only option. But that is working around the problem, not solving it.

(5) In the 1990s Mr Cardoso’s government privatised state-owned oil, energy and telecoms firms. It allowed private operators to lease terminals in public ports and to build their own new ports. Imports were booming as the economy opened up, so container terminals were a priority. The one at the public port in Bahia’s capital, Salvador, is an example of the transformation wrought by private money and management. Its customers used to rate it Brazil’s worst port, with a draft too shallow for big ships and a quay so short that even smaller vessels had to unload a bit at a time. But in the past decade its operator, Wilson & Sons, spent 260m reais on replacing equipment, lengthening the quay and deepening the draft. Capacity has doubled. Land access will improve, too, once an almost finished expressway opens. Paranaguá is spending 400m reais from its own revenues on replacing outdated equipment, but without private money it cannot expand enough to end the queues to dock. It has drawn up detailed plans to build a new terminal and two new quays, and identified 20 dockside areas that could be leased to new operators, which would bring in 1.6 billion reais of private investment. All that is missing is the federal government’s permission. It hopes to get it next year, but there is no guarantee.

(6) Firms that want to build their own infrastructure, such as mining companies, which need dedicated railways and ports, can generally build at will in Brazil, though they still face the hassle of environmental licensing. If the government wants to hand a project to the private sector it will hold an auction, granting the concession to the highest bidder, or sometimes the applicant who promises the lowest user charges. But since Lula came to power in 2003 there have been few infrastructure auctions of any kind. In recent years, under heavy lobbying from public ports, the ports regulator stopped granting operating licences to private ports except those intended mainly for the owners’ own cargo. As a result, during a decade in which Brazil became a commodity-exporting powerhouse, its bulk-cargo terminals hardly expanded at all.

(7) At first Lula’s government planned to upgrade Brazil’s infrastructure without private help. In 2007 the president announced a collection of long-mooted public construction projects, the Growth Acceleration Programme (PAC). Many were intended to give farming and mining regions access to alternative ports. But the results have been disappointing. Two-thirds of the biggest projects are late and over budget. The trans-north-eastern railway is only half-built and its cost has doubled. The route of the east-west integration railway, which would cross Bahia, has still not been settled. The northern stretch of the BR-163, a trunk road built in the 1970s, was waiting so long to be paved that locals started calling it the “endless road”. Most of it is still waiting.

(8) What has got things moving is the prospect of disgrace during the forthcoming big sporting events. Brazil’s terrible airports will be the first thing most foreign football fans see when they arrive for next year’s World Cup. Infraero, the state-owned company that runs them, was meant to be getting them ready for the extra traffic, but it is a byword for incompetence. Between 2007 and 2010 it managed to spend just 800m of the 3 billion reais it was supposed to invest. In desperation, the government last year leased three of the biggest airports to private operators.

(9) That seemed to break a bigger logjam. First more airport auctions were mooted; then, some months later, Ms Rousseff announced that 7,500km of toll roads and 10,000km of railways were to be auctioned too. Earlier this year she picked the biggest fight of her presidency, pushing a ports bill through Congress against lobbying from powerful vested interests. The new law enables private ports once again to handle third-party cargo and allows them to hire their own staff, rather than having to use casual labour from the dockworkers’ unions that have a monopoly in public ports. Ms Rousseff also promised to auction some entirely new projects and to re-tender around 150 contracts in public terminals whose concessions had expired.

(10) Would-be investors in port projects are hanging back because of the high chances of cost overruns and long delays. Two newly built private terminals at Santos that together cost more than 4 billion reais illustrate the risks. Both took years to get off the ground and years more to build. Both were finished earlier this year but remained idle for months. Brasil Terminal Portuário, a private terminal within the public port, is still waiting for the government to dredge its access channel. At Embraport, which is outside the public-port area, union members from Santos blocked road access and boarded any ships that tried to dock. Rather than enforcing the law that allows such terminals to use their own workers, the government summoned the management to Brasília for some arm-twisting. In August Embraport agreed to take the union members “on a trial basis”.

(11) Given such regulatory and execution risks, there are unlikely to be many takers for either rail or port projects as currently conceived, says Bruno Savaris, an infrastructure analyst at Credit Suisse. He predicts that at most a third of the planned investments will be auctioned in the next three years: airports, a few simple port projects and the best toll roads. That is far short of what Brazil needs. The good news, says Mr Savaris, is that the government is at last beginning to understand that it must either reduce the risks for private investors or raise their returns. Private know-how and money will be vital to get Brazil moving again.

(www.economist.com/news/special-report. Adapted)

In the sentence fragment from the last paragraph – it must - FGV 2014

Inglês - 2023

Read the article and answer the question

The road to hell

(1) Bringing crops from one of the futuristic new farms in Brazil’s central and northern plains to foreign markets means taking a journey back in time. Loaded onto lorries, most are driven almost 2,000km south on narrow, potholed roads to the ports of Santos and Paranaguá. In the 19th and early 20th centuries they were used to bring in immigrants and ship out the coffee grown in the fertile states of São Paulo and Paraná, but now they are overwhelmed. Thanks to a record harvest this year, Brazil became the world’s largest soya producer, overtaking the United States. The queue of lorries waiting to enter Santos sometimes stretched to 40km.

(2) No part of that journey makes sense. Brazil has too few crop silos, so lorries are used for storage as well as transport, causing a crush at ports after harvest. Produce from so far north should probably not be travelling to southern ports at all. Freight by road costs twice as much as by rail and four times as much as by water. Brazilian farmers pay 25% or more of the value of their soya to bring it to port; their competitors in Iowa just 9%. The bottleneck at ports pushes costs higher still. It also puts off customers. In March Sunrise Group, China’s biggest soya trader, cancelled an order for 2m tonnes of Brazilian soya after repeated delays.

(3) All of Brazil’s infrastructure is decrepit. The World Economic Forum ranks it at 114th out of 148 countries. After a spate of railway-building at the turn of the 20th century, and road- and dam-building 50 years later, little was added or even maintained. In the 1980s infrastructure was a casualty of slowing growth and spiralling inflation. Unable to find jobs, engineers emigrated or retrained. Government stopped planning for the long term. According to Contas Abertas, a public-spending watchdog, only a fifth of federal money budgeted for urban transport in the past decade was actually spent. Just 1.5% of Brazil’s GDP goes on infrastructure investment from all sources, both public and private. The long-run global average is 3.8%. The McKinsey Global Institute estimates the total value of Brazil’s infrastructure at 16% of GDP. Other big economies average 71%. To catch up, Brazil would have to triple its annual infrastructure spending for the next 20 years.

(4) Moreover, it may be getting poor value from what little it does invest because so much goes on the wrong things. A cumbersome environmental-licensing process pushes up costs and causes delays. Expensive studies are required before construction on big projects can start and then again at various stages along the way and at the end. Farmers and manufacturers spend heavily on lorries because road transport is their only option. But that is working around the problem, not solving it.

(5) In the 1990s Mr Cardoso’s government privatised state-owned oil, energy and telecoms firms. It allowed private operators to lease terminals in public ports and to build their own new ports. Imports were booming as the economy opened up, so container terminals were a priority. The one at the public port in Bahia’s capital, Salvador, is an example of the transformation wrought by private money and management. Its customers used to rate it Brazil’s worst port, with a draft too shallow for big ships and a quay so short that even smaller vessels had to unload a bit at a time. But in the past decade its operator, Wilson & Sons, spent 260m reais on replacing equipment, lengthening the quay and deepening the draft. Capacity has doubled. Land access will improve, too, once an almost finished expressway opens. Paranaguá is spending 400m reais from its own revenues on replacing outdated equipment, but without private money it cannot expand enough to end the queues to dock. It has drawn up detailed plans to build a new terminal and two new quays, and identified 20 dockside areas that could be leased to new operators, which would bring in 1.6 billion reais of private investment. All that is missing is the federal government’s permission. It hopes to get it next year, but there is no guarantee.

(6) Firms that want to build their own infrastructure, such as mining companies, which need dedicated railways and ports, can generally build at will in Brazil, though they still face the hassle of environmental licensing. If the government wants to hand a project to the private sector it will hold an auction, granting the concession to the highest bidder, or sometimes the applicant who promises the lowest user charges. But since Lula came to power in 2003 there have been few infrastructure auctions of any kind. In recent years, under heavy lobbying from public ports, the ports regulator stopped granting operating licences to private ports except those intended mainly for the owners’ own cargo. As a result, during a decade in which Brazil became a commodity-exporting powerhouse, its bulk-cargo terminals hardly expanded at all.

(7) At first Lula’s government planned to upgrade Brazil’s infrastructure without private help. In 2007 the president announced a collection of long-mooted public construction projects, the Growth Acceleration Programme (PAC). Many were intended to give farming and mining regions access to alternative ports. But the results have been disappointing. Two-thirds of the biggest projects are late and over budget. The trans-north-eastern railway is only half-built and its cost has doubled. The route of the east-west integration railway, which would cross Bahia, has still not been settled. The northern stretch of the BR-163, a trunk road built in the 1970s, was waiting so long to be paved that locals started calling it the “endless road”. Most of it is still waiting.

(8) What has got things moving is the prospect of disgrace during the forthcoming big sporting events. Brazil’s terrible airports will be the first thing most foreign football fans see when they arrive for next year’s World Cup. Infraero, the state-owned company that runs them, was meant to be getting them ready for the extra traffic, but it is a byword for incompetence. Between 2007 and 2010 it managed to spend just 800m of the 3 billion reais it was supposed to invest. In desperation, the government last year leased three of the biggest airports to private operators.

(9) That seemed to break a bigger logjam. First more airport auctions were mooted; then, some months later, Ms Rousseff announced that 7,500km of toll roads and 10,000km of railways were to be auctioned too. Earlier this year she picked the biggest fight of her presidency, pushing a ports bill through Congress against lobbying from powerful vested interests. The new law enables private ports once again to handle third-party cargo and allows them to hire their own staff, rather than having to use casual labour from the dockworkers’ unions that have a monopoly in public ports. Ms Rousseff also promised to auction some entirely new projects and to re-tender around 150 contracts in public terminals whose concessions had expired.

(10) Would-be investors in port projects are hanging back because of the high chances of cost overruns and long delays. Two newly built private terminals at Santos that together cost more than 4 billion reais illustrate the risks. Both took years to get off the ground and years more to build. Both were finished earlier this year but remained idle for months. Brasil Terminal Portuário, a private terminal within the public port, is still waiting for the government to dredge its access channel. At Embraport, which is outside the public-port area, union members from Santos blocked road access and boarded any ships that tried to dock. Rather than enforcing the law that allows such terminals to use their own workers, the government summoned the management to Brasília for some arm-twisting. In August Embraport agreed to take the union members “on a trial basis”.

(11) Given such regulatory and execution risks, there are unlikely to be many takers for either rail or port projects as currently conceived, says Bruno Savaris, an infrastructure analyst at Credit Suisse. He predicts that at most a third of the planned investments will be auctioned in the next three years: airports, a few simple port projects and the best toll roads. That is far short of what Brazil needs. The good news, says Mr Savaris, is that the government is at last beginning to understand that it must either reduce the risks for private investors or raise their returns. Private know-how and money will be vital to get Brazil moving again.

(www.economist.com/news/special-report. Adapted)

Segundo o texto, o mercado de trabalho na área - FATEC 2023

Inglês - 2023

Tech job market is up this year

Despite high-profile threats of layoffs and a dip in job postings in June, the tech market remains strong, especially for data-related skills.

By Paul Krill
Editor at Large, InfoWorld | AUG 24, 2022 3:00 AM PDT

Demand for tech talent continues to grow, with the number of job postings growing 45 % since the beginning of the year and increasing 52 % compared to the first half of 2021. A hiring spike in May was followed by the first month-to-month decline this year (17 % in June).
Those with skills to build and maintain tech stacks and databases, such as SQL and automation, have a great shot at landing a job anywhere.
Of the top 50 employers of tech talent, 96 % increased hiring in the first half of 2022 when compared to the same period of 2021.
Technologists’ preference for remote and hybrid work persists.
Traditional tech hubs such as New York City, Chicago, Atlanta, and San Francisco continue to lead in tech job postings.

Assinale a alternativa que apresenta o correto par de - FATEC 2023

Inglês - 2023

Tech job market is up this year

Despite high-profile threats of layoffs and a dip in job postings in June, the tech market remains strong, especially for data-related skills.

By Paul Krill
Editor at Large, InfoWorld | AUG 24, 2022 3:00 AM PDT

Demand for tech talent continues to grow, with the number of job postings growing 45 % since the beginning of the year and increasing 52 % compared to the first half of 2021. A hiring spike in May was followed by the first month-to-month decline this year (17 % in June).
Those with skills to build and maintain tech stacks and databases, such as SQL and automation, have a great shot at landing a job anywhere.
Of the top 50 employers of tech talent, 96 % increased hiring in the first half of 2022 when compared to the same period of 2021.
Technologists’ preference for remote and hybrid work persists.
Traditional tech hubs such as New York City, Chicago, Atlanta, and San Francisco continue to lead in tech job postings.

Com a avalanche de dados diários, os especialistas em - FATEC 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o cartum.

FATEC 2023

Leia o texto. Climate change expected to reduce the - FATEC 2023

Inglês - 2023

Leia o texto.

Climate change expected to reduce the quality of ground-based astronomical observations


02 Oct 2022
Climate change will negatively impact the quality of ground-based astronomical observations and is likely to increase time lost due to deteriorating site conditions. That is the conclusion of an analysis of changing trends in observing conditions across eight worldwide sites. The authors say it is now vital that astronomers consider longterm climate projections when selecting sites to host future telescopes.
The quality of astronomical observations by groundbased telescopes is significantly influenced by climate conditions. Sites for observatories are often placed at high altitude to take advantage of increased atmospheric clarity and such locations are carefully selected for favourable climate conditions such as low temperature and water vapour.

O fenômeno descrito no texto indica a prática de - FATEC 2023

Inglês - 2023

Cherry picking in the media

Cherry picking is often used by the media, particularly in the case of less reputable media bodies, when they present only one side of a story, or give it disproportional coverage while ignoring facts that could support alternative viewpoints.
For example, consider a situation where a new study, which is based on the input of thousands of scientists in a certain field, finds that 99% of them agree with the consensus position on a certain phenomenon, and only 1% of them disagree with it. When reporting on this study,
a reporter who engages in cherry picking might say the following:
“A recent study found that there are plenty of scientists who disagree with the consensus position on this phenomenon.”
This statement represents an example of cherry picking, because it only mentions the fact that the study found that some scientists disagree with the consensus position on the phenomenon in question, while ignoring the fact that the study in question also found that the vast majority of scientists support this position.

A expressão plenty of na sentença “there are plenty of - FATEC 2023

Inglês - 2023

Cherry picking in the media

Cherry picking is often used by the media, particularly in the case of less reputable media bodies, when they present only one side of a story, or give it disproportional coverage while ignoring facts that could support alternative viewpoints.
For example, consider a situation where a new study, which is based on the input of thousands of scientists in a certain field, finds that 99% of them agree with the consensus position on a certain phenomenon, and only 1% of them disagree with it. When reporting on this study,
a reporter who engages in cherry picking might say the following:
“A recent study found that there are plenty of scientists who disagree with the consensus position on this phenomenon.”
This statement represents an example of cherry picking, because it only mentions the fact that the study found that some scientists disagree with the consensus position on the phenomenon in question, while ignoring the fact that the study in question also found that the vast majority of scientists support this position.

The title and the lead-in (in journalist jargon, the line - FGV 2015

Inglês - 2023

Read the text and answer the question

Argentina defaults – Eighth time unlucky



Cristina Fernández argues that her country’s latest default is different. She is missing the point.

Aug 2nd 2014
ARGENTINA’S first bond, issued in 1824, was supposed to have had a lifespan of 46 years. Less than four years later, the government defaulted. Resolving the ensuing stand-off with creditors took 29 years. Since then seven more defaults have followed, the most recent this week, when Argentina failed to make a payment on bonds issued as partial compensation to victims of the previous default, in 2001.
Most investors think they can see a pattern in all this, but Argentina’s president, Cristina Fernández de Kirchner, insists the latest default is not like the others. Her government, she points out, had transferred the full $539m it owed to the banks that administer the bonds. It is America’s courts (the bonds were issued under American law) that blocked the payment, at the behest of the tiny minority of owners of bonds from 2001 who did not accept the restructuring Argentina offered them in 2005 and again in 2010. These “hold-outs”, balking at the 65% haircut the restructuring entailed, not only persuaded a judge that they should be paid in full but also got him to freeze payments on the restructured bonds until Argentina coughs up.
Argentina claims that paying the hold-outs was impossible. It is not just that they are “vultures” as Argentine officials often put it, who bought the bonds for cents on the dollar after the previous default and are now holding those who accepted the restructuring (accounting for 93% of the debt) to ransom. The main problem is that a clause in the restructured bonds prohibits Argentina from offering the hold-outs better terms without paying everyone else the same. Since it cannot afford to do that, it says it had no choice but to default.
Yet it is not certain that the clause requiring equal treatment of all bondholders would have applied, given that Argentina would not have been paying the hold-outs voluntarily, but on the courts’ orders. Moreover, some owners of the restructured bonds had agreed to waive their rights; had Argentina made a concerted effort to persuade the remainder to do the same, it might have succeeded. Lawyers and bankers have suggested various ways around the clause in question, which expires at the end of the year. But Argentina’s government was slow to consider these options or negotiate with the hold-outs, hiding instead behind indignant nationalism.
Ms Fernández is right that the consequences of America’s court rulings have been perverse, unleashing a big financial dispute in an attempt to solve a relatively small one. But hers is not the first government to be hit with an awkward verdict. Instead of railing against it, she should have tried to minimise the harm it did. Defaulting has helped no one: none of the bondholders will now be paid, Argentina looks like a pariah again, and its economy will remain starved of loans and investment.
Happily, much of the damage can still be undone. It is not too late to strike a deal with the hold-outs or back an ostensibly private effort to buy out their claims. A quick fix would make it easier for Argentina to borrow again internationally. That, in turn, would speed development of big oil and gas deposits, the income from which could help ease its money troubles.
More important, it would help to change perceptions of Argentina as a financial rogue state. Over the past year or so Ms Fernández seems to have been trying to rehabilitate Argentina’s image and resuscitate its faltering economy. She settled financial disputes with government creditors and with Repsol, a Spanish oil firm whose Argentine assets she had expropriated in 2012. This week’s events have overshadowed all that. For its own sake, and everyone else’s, Argentina should hold its nose and do a deal with the hold-outs.

(http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21610263. Adapted)

The literary principle according to which the writing and - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

The literary principle according to which the writing and criticism of poetry and drama were to be guided by rules and precedents derived from the best ancient Greek and Roman authors; a codified form of classicism that dominated French literature in the 17th and 18th centuries, with a significant influence on English writing, especially from c.1660 to c.1780. In a more general sense, often employed in contrast with romanticism, the term has also been used to describe the characteristic world-view or value-system of this “Age of Reason”, denoting a preference for rationality, clarity, restraint, order, and decorum, and for general truths rather than particular insights.

The information presented by the graph, the map and the - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

In March 2022, parts of Antarctica have been 40 ºC warmer than their March average

UNESP 2023
UNESP 2023

The Concordia research station is one of the most inhospitable places on Earth. At 3,000 m above sea level on the Antarctic Plateau, the temperature rarely rises above -25 ºC even in the summer. In midwinter it can fall to around -80 ºC. The air is painfully dry, and fingers, toes and noses can freeze in minutes. The dozen or so crew, mainly French and Italian, who live and work in the station would normally venture out only for essential work. But Concordia has recently experienced a heatwave. On March 18th the temperature reached a high of -11.8 ºC — more than 40 ºC warmer than the average for this time of year.
Similarly freakish weather was recorded across eastern Antarctica. Temperatures at the Russian-run Vostok research station rose to -17.7 ºC, more than 15 ºC above the previous record for March, set in 1967. Across the continent temperatures were 4.5 ºC higher than usual (though in recent days they have returned to a normal range).
Meteorologists have attributed the latest heatwave to an atmospheric “river” of warm, damp air blowing towards Antarctica from the Southern Ocean near Australia. It is difficult to know whether climate change is to blame for one-off weather events. But over the past 65 years or so there has been an increase in the number of “high temperature” days at Antarctic stations.
Most regions of Antarctica have been spared global warming. In the late 20th century, a large hole opened up in the ozone layer above the South Pole. This has a regional cooling effect, which has offset much of the heating caused by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Temperatures on the continent rarely climb above freezing, which preserves its vast ice sheets (although rising sea temperatures do threaten some areas). Even in the recent surge, temperatures stayed well below zero.

As informações apresentadas pelo gráfico também podem ser - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

In March 2022, parts of Antarctica have been 40 ºC warmer than their March average

UNESP 2023
UNESP 2023

The Concordia research station is one of the most inhospitable places on Earth. At 3,000 m above sea level on the Antarctic Plateau, the temperature rarely rises above -25 ºC even in the summer. In midwinter it can fall to around -80 ºC. The air is painfully dry, and fingers, toes and noses can freeze in minutes. The dozen or so crew, mainly French and Italian, who live and work in the station would normally venture out only for essential work. But Concordia has recently experienced a heatwave. On March 18th the temperature reached a high of -11.8 ºC — more than 40 ºC warmer than the average for this time of year.
Similarly freakish weather was recorded across eastern Antarctica. Temperatures at the Russian-run Vostok research station rose to -17.7 ºC, more than 15 ºC above the previous record for March, set in 1967. Across the continent temperatures were 4.5 ºC higher than usual (though in recent days they have returned to a normal range).
Meteorologists have attributed the latest heatwave to an atmospheric “river” of warm, damp air blowing towards Antarctica from the Southern Ocean near Australia. It is difficult to know whether climate change is to blame for one-off weather events. But over the past 65 years or so there has been an increase in the number of “high temperature” days at Antarctic stations.
Most regions of Antarctica have been spared global warming. In the late 20th century, a large hole opened up in the ozone layer above the South Pole. This has a regional cooling effect, which has offset much of the heating caused by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Temperatures on the continent rarely climb above freezing, which preserves its vast ice sheets (although rising sea temperatures do threaten some areas). Even in the recent surge, temperatures stayed well below zero.

Based on your knowledge of geography, as well as on the - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

In March 2022, parts of Antarctica have been 40 ºC warmer than their March average

UNESP 2023
UNESP 2023

The Concordia research station is one of the most inhospitable places on Earth. At 3,000 m above sea level on the Antarctic Plateau, the temperature rarely rises above -25 ºC even in the summer. In midwinter it can fall to around -80 ºC. The air is painfully dry, and fingers, toes and noses can freeze in minutes. The dozen or so crew, mainly French and Italian, who live and work in the station would normally venture out only for essential work. But Concordia has recently experienced a heatwave. On March 18th the temperature reached a high of -11.8 ºC — more than 40 ºC warmer than the average for this time of year.
Similarly freakish weather was recorded across eastern Antarctica. Temperatures at the Russian-run Vostok research station rose to -17.7 ºC, more than 15 ºC above the previous record for March, set in 1967. Across the continent temperatures were 4.5 ºC higher than usual (though in recent days they have returned to a normal range).
Meteorologists have attributed the latest heatwave to an atmospheric “river” of warm, damp air blowing towards Antarctica from the Southern Ocean near Australia. It is difficult to know whether climate change is to blame for one-off weather events. But over the past 65 years or so there has been an increase in the number of “high temperature” days at Antarctic stations.
Most regions of Antarctica have been spared global warming. In the late 20th century, a large hole opened up in the ozone layer above the South Pole. This has a regional cooling effect, which has offset much of the heating caused by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Temperatures on the continent rarely climb above freezing, which preserves its vast ice sheets (although rising sea temperatures do threaten some areas). Even in the recent surge, temperatures stayed well below zero.

No contexto apresentado pelo segundo parágrafo, o trecho - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

In March 2022, parts of Antarctica have been 40 ºC warmer than their March average

UNESP 2023
UNESP 2023

The Concordia research station is one of the most inhospitable places on Earth. At 3,000 m above sea level on the Antarctic Plateau, the temperature rarely rises above -25 ºC even in the summer. In midwinter it can fall to around -80 ºC. The air is painfully dry, and fingers, toes and noses can freeze in minutes. The dozen or so crew, mainly French and Italian, who live and work in the station would normally venture out only for essential work. But Concordia has recently experienced a heatwave. On March 18th the temperature reached a high of -11.8 ºC — more than 40 ºC warmer than the average for this time of year.
Similarly freakish weather was recorded across eastern Antarctica. Temperatures at the Russian-run Vostok research station rose to -17.7 ºC, more than 15 ºC above the previous record for March, set in 1967. Across the continent temperatures were 4.5 ºC higher than usual (though in recent days they have returned to a normal range).
Meteorologists have attributed the latest heatwave to an atmospheric “river” of warm, damp air blowing towards Antarctica from the Southern Ocean near Australia. It is difficult to know whether climate change is to blame for one-off weather events. But over the past 65 years or so there has been an increase in the number of “high temperature” days at Antarctic stations.
Most regions of Antarctica have been spared global warming. In the late 20th century, a large hole opened up in the ozone layer above the South Pole. This has a regional cooling effect, which has offset much of the heating caused by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Temperatures on the continent rarely climb above freezing, which preserves its vast ice sheets (although rising sea temperatures do threaten some areas). Even in the recent surge, temperatures stayed well below zero.

According to the third paragraph, meteorologists - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

In March 2022, parts of Antarctica have been 40 ºC warmer than their March average

UNESP 2023
UNESP 2023

The Concordia research station is one of the most inhospitable places on Earth. At 3,000 m above sea level on the Antarctic Plateau, the temperature rarely rises above -25 ºC even in the summer. In midwinter it can fall to around -80 ºC. The air is painfully dry, and fingers, toes and noses can freeze in minutes. The dozen or so crew, mainly French and Italian, who live and work in the station would normally venture out only for essential work. But Concordia has recently experienced a heatwave. On March 18th the temperature reached a high of -11.8 ºC — more than 40 ºC warmer than the average for this time of year.
Similarly freakish weather was recorded across eastern Antarctica. Temperatures at the Russian-run Vostok research station rose to -17.7 ºC, more than 15 ºC above the previous record for March, set in 1967. Across the continent temperatures were 4.5 ºC higher than usual (though in recent days they have returned to a normal range).
Meteorologists have attributed the latest heatwave to an atmospheric “river” of warm, damp air blowing towards Antarctica from the Southern Ocean near Australia. It is difficult to know whether climate change is to blame for one-off weather events. But over the past 65 years or so there has been an increase in the number of “high temperature” days at Antarctic stations.
Most regions of Antarctica have been spared global warming. In the late 20th century, a large hole opened up in the ozone layer above the South Pole. This has a regional cooling effect, which has offset much of the heating caused by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Temperatures on the continent rarely climb above freezing, which preserves its vast ice sheets (although rising sea temperatures do threaten some areas). Even in the recent surge, temperatures stayed well below zero.

No quarto parágrafo, afirma-se que um grande buraco se - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

In March 2022, parts of Antarctica have been 40 ºC warmer than their March average

UNESP 2023
UNESP 2023

The Concordia research station is one of the most inhospitable places on Earth. At 3,000 m above sea level on the Antarctic Plateau, the temperature rarely rises above -25 ºC even in the summer. In midwinter it can fall to around -80 ºC. The air is painfully dry, and fingers, toes and noses can freeze in minutes. The dozen or so crew, mainly French and Italian, who live and work in the station would normally venture out only for essential work. But Concordia has recently experienced a heatwave. On March 18th the temperature reached a high of -11.8 ºC — more than 40 ºC warmer than the average for this time of year.
Similarly freakish weather was recorded across eastern Antarctica. Temperatures at the Russian-run Vostok research station rose to -17.7 ºC, more than 15 ºC above the previous record for March, set in 1967. Across the continent temperatures were 4.5 ºC higher than usual (though in recent days they have returned to a normal range).
Meteorologists have attributed the latest heatwave to an atmospheric “river” of warm, damp air blowing towards Antarctica from the Southern Ocean near Australia. It is difficult to know whether climate change is to blame for one-off weather events. But over the past 65 years or so there has been an increase in the number of “high temperature” days at Antarctic stations.
Most regions of Antarctica have been spared global warming. In the late 20th century, a large hole opened up in the ozone layer above the South Pole. This has a regional cooling effect, which has offset much of the heating caused by rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Temperatures on the continent rarely climb above freezing, which preserves its vast ice sheets (although rising sea temperatures do threaten some areas). Even in the recent surge, temperatures stayed well below zero.

According to the text, the World Happiness Report 2022 - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

World’s happiest ranking goes to Finland for fifth year in a row

UNESP 2023

Finland was crowned the happiest country in the world for the fifth consecutive year, with a score significantly ahead of its peers in the World Happiness Report 2022 ranking, published by a body linked to the United Nations. However, the authors detected, on average, a long-term moderate upward trend in stress, worry, and sadness in most countries, as well as “a slight long-term decline in the enjoyment of life,” they wrote.
The report uses global survey data to report on how people evaluate their own lives in more than 150 countries around the world, with the ranking based on a three-year average. Key variables that contribute to explaining people’s life evaluations include healthy life expectancy, generosity, social support, freedom to make life choices, perceptions of corruption, and the gross domestic product per capita (an indicator that measures a country’s economic output per person, that is calculated by dividing the total gross domestic product of a country by its population).
“World leaders should take heed,” Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University, said. “Politics should be directed as the great sages long ago insisted: to the well-being of the people, not the power of the rulers.”

De acordo com o texto, uma das variáveis que ajuda a - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

World’s happiest ranking goes to Finland for fifth year in a row

UNESP 2023

Finland was crowned the happiest country in the world for the fifth consecutive year, with a score significantly ahead of its peers in the World Happiness Report 2022 ranking, published by a body linked to the United Nations. However, the authors detected, on average, a long-term moderate upward trend in stress, worry, and sadness in most countries, as well as “a slight long-term decline in the enjoyment of life,” they wrote.
The report uses global survey data to report on how people evaluate their own lives in more than 150 countries around the world, with the ranking based on a three-year average. Key variables that contribute to explaining people’s life evaluations include healthy life expectancy, generosity, social support, freedom to make life choices, perceptions of corruption, and the gross domestic product per capita (an indicator that measures a country’s economic output per person, that is calculated by dividing the total gross domestic product of a country by its population).
“World leaders should take heed,” Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University, said. “Politics should be directed as the great sages long ago insisted: to the well-being of the people, not the power of the rulers.”

No trecho do terceiro parágrafo ‘“World leaders should - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

World’s happiest ranking goes to Finland for fifth year in a row

UNESP 2023

Finland was crowned the happiest country in the world for the fifth consecutive year, with a score significantly ahead of its peers in the World Happiness Report 2022 ranking, published by a body linked to the United Nations. However, the authors detected, on average, a long-term moderate upward trend in stress, worry, and sadness in most countries, as well as “a slight long-term decline in the enjoyment of life,” they wrote.
The report uses global survey data to report on how people evaluate their own lives in more than 150 countries around the world, with the ranking based on a three-year average. Key variables that contribute to explaining people’s life evaluations include healthy life expectancy, generosity, social support, freedom to make life choices, perceptions of corruption, and the gross domestic product per capita (an indicator that measures a country’s economic output per person, that is calculated by dividing the total gross domestic product of a country by its population).
“World leaders should take heed,” Jeffrey Sachs, director of the Center for Sustainable Development at Columbia University, said. “Politics should be directed as the great sages long ago insisted: to the well-being of the people, not the power of the rulers.”

O texto apresenta uma crítica às exposições de arte - FUVEST 2024

Inglês - 2023

Vincent van Gogh. Salvador Dalí. Frida Kahlo. Casual perusers of ads everywhere would be forgiven for thinking that art galleries are enjoying some sort of golden age. The truth is less exciting, more expensive and certainly more depressing. For this is no ordinary art on offer; this art is “immersive”, the latest lovechild of TikTok and enterprising warehouse landlords. The first problem with immersive art? It's not actually very immersive. A common trope of “immersive” retrospectives is to recreate original pieces using gimmicky tech. But merely aiming a projector at a blank canvas doesn’t do much in the way of sensory stimulation. My favourite element of an “immersive” show I have been to was their faithful recreation of Van Gogh’s bedroom. An ambitious feat, executed with some furniture and, of course, mutilated pastiches of his paintings. While projectors, surround sound and uncomfortably wacky seating are mainstays of immersive art, there are also the VR headsets. But many exhibitions don’t even include these with the standard ticket, so my return to reality has twice been accompanied by an usher brandishing a credit card machine. Sometimes these installations are so banal and depthless, visitors have often walked through installations entirely oblivious to whatever is happening around them. Despite the fixation “immersive experiences” have with novelty, the products of their labours are remarkably similar: disappointing light shows punctuated by a few gamified set pieces.

From the comic strip, one can say that happiness a) could - UNESP 2023

Inglês - 2023

UNESP 2023

O texto informa que, na opinião do jornalista Tim Adams - FUVEST 2022

Inglês - 2022

TEXTO PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 42 A 44

Questão 42 - FUVEST 2022

Fatbergs are a growing scourge infesting cities around the world—some are more than 800 feet long and weigh more than four humpback whales. These gross globs, which can cause sewer systems to block up and even overflow, have been plaguing the U.S., Great Britain and Australia for the past decade, forcing governments and utilities companies to send workers down into the sewers armed with water hoses, vacuums and scrapers with the unenviable task of prying them loose.

"It is hard not to think of [fatbergs] as a tangible symbol of the way we live now, the ultimate product of our disposable, out ofsight, out of mind culture," wrote journalist Tim Adams in The Guardian.

At their core, fatbergs are the accumulation of oil and grease that's been poured down the drain, congealing around flushed nonbiological waste like tampons, condoms and baby wipes.

When fat sticks to the side of sewage pipes, the wipes and other detritus get stuck, accumulating layer upon layer of gunk in a sort of slimy snowball effect.

Fatbergs also collect other kinds of debris—London fatbergs have been cracked open to reveal pens, false teeth and even watches.

Restaurants are a big contributor to fatbergs: Thames Water, the London utilities company, found nine out of 10 fast-food eateries lacked adequate grease traps to stop fat from enteringthe sewers. Homeowners also contribute to the problem by pouring grease and fat down the sink.

Even though its component materials are soft, fatbergs themselves can be tough as rocks. Researchers have found a hostof dangerous bacteria in fatbergs, including listeria and e.coli.

Fatbergs are notorious for their fetid smell, which can make even the hardiest sewer workers gag, and chipping away at one can release noxious gases.

The key to fatberg prevention is remembering the four Ps: Pee, poo, puke and (toilet) paper are the only things that should be flushed.

De acordo com o texto, o processo de bloqueio do fluxo - FUVEST 2022

Inglês - 2022

TEXTO PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 42 A 44

Questão 43 - FUVEST 2022

Fatbergs are a growing scourge infesting cities around the world—some are more than 800 feet long and weigh more than four humpback whales. These gross globs, which can cause sewer systems to block up and even overflow, have been plaguing the U.S., Great Britain and Australia for the past decade, forcing governments and utilities companies to send workers down into the sewers armed with water hoses, vacuums and scrapers with the unenviable task of prying them loose.

"It is hard not to think of [fatbergs] as a tangible symbol of the way we live now, the ultimate product of our disposable, out ofsight, out of mind culture," wrote journalist Tim Adams in The Guardian.

At their core, fatbergs are the accumulation of oil and grease that's been poured down the drain, congealing around flushed nonbiological waste like tampons, condoms and baby wipes.

When fat sticks to the side of sewage pipes, the wipes and other detritus get stuck, accumulating layer upon layer of gunk in a sort of slimy snowball effect.

Fatbergs also collect other kinds of debris—London fatbergs have been cracked open to reveal pens, false teeth and even watches.

Restaurants are a big contributor to fatbergs: Thames Water, the London utilities company, found nine out of 10 fast-food eateries lacked adequate grease traps to stop fat from enteringthe sewers. Homeowners also contribute to the problem by pouring grease and fat down the sink.

Even though its component materials are soft, fatbergs themselves can be tough as rocks. Researchers have found a hostof dangerous bacteria in fatbergs, including listeria and e.coli.

Fatbergs are notorious for their fetid smell, which can make even the hardiest sewer workers gag, and chipping away at one can release noxious gases.

The key to fatberg prevention is remembering the four Ps: Pee, poo, puke and (toilet) paper are the only things that should be flushed.

Considerado o contexto, os quatro elementos associados à - FUVEST 2022

Inglês - 2022

TEXTO PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 42 A 44

Questão 44 - FUVEST 2022

Fatbergs are a growing scourge infesting cities around the world—some are more than 800 feet long and weigh more than four humpback whales. These gross globs, which can cause sewer systems to block up and even overflow, have been plaguing the U.S., Great Britain and Australia for the past decade, forcing governments and utilities companies to send workers down into the sewers armed with water hoses, vacuums and scrapers with the unenviable task of prying them loose.

"It is hard not to think of [fatbergs] as a tangible symbol of the way we live now, the ultimate product of our disposable, out ofsight, out of mind culture," wrote journalist Tim Adams in The Guardian.

At their core, fatbergs are the accumulation of oil and grease that's been poured down the drain, congealing around flushed nonbiological waste like tampons, condoms and baby wipes.

When fat sticks to the side of sewage pipes, the wipes and other detritus get stuck, accumulating layer upon layer of gunk in a sort of slimy snowball effect.

Fatbergs also collect other kinds of debris—London fatbergs have been cracked open to reveal pens, false teeth and even watches.

Restaurants are a big contributor to fatbergs: Thames Water, the London utilities company, found nine out of 10 fast-food eateries lacked adequate grease traps to stop fat from enteringthe sewers. Homeowners also contribute to the problem by pouring grease and fat down the sink.

Even though its component materials are soft, fatbergs themselves can be tough as rocks. Researchers have found a hostof dangerous bacteria in fatbergs, including listeria and e.coli.

Fatbergs are notorious for their fetid smell, which can make even the hardiest sewer workers gag, and chipping away at one can release noxious gases.

The key to fatberg prevention is remembering the four Ps: Pee, poo, puke and (toilet) paper are the only things that should be flushed.

De acordo com o texto, para os proprietários de restaurante - FUVEST

Inglês - 2022

TEXTO PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 45 A 47

If you take a look at my smartphone, you’ll know that I like to order out. But am I helping the small local businesses? You would think that if you own a restaurant you’d be thrilled to have an outsourced service that would take care of your delivery operations while leveraging their marketing might to expand your businesses’ brand. However, restaurant owners have complained of lack of quality control once their food goes out the door. They don’t like that the delivery people are the face of their product when it gets into the customer’s hand. Some of the delivery services have been accused of listing restaurants on their apps without the owners’ permission, and oftentimes publish menu items and prices that are incorrect or out of date.

But there is another reason why restaurant owners aren’t fond of delivery services. It’s the costs, which, for some, are becoming unsustainable. Even with the increased revenues from the delivery services, the fees wind up killing a restaurant’s margins to the extent that it’s at best marginally profitable. Therefore, some restaurants are pushing harder to drive orders from their own websites and offering special deals for customers that use their in-house delivery people. The simple fact is that these delivery apps are here to stay. They are enormously popular and have significantly grown. I believe that restaurant owners that resist these apps are hurting their brands by missing out on potential customers. The good news is that the delivery platforms are not as evil as some would portray them. They have some skin in the game. They are competing against other services. They want their listed restaurants to profit. Maybe instead of fighting, the nation’s restaurant industry needs to proactively embrace the delivery service industry and figure out ways to profitably work together.

Segundo o texto, uma das soluções encontradas pelos donos- FUVEST 2022

Inglês - 2022

TEXTO PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 45 A 47

If you take a look at my smartphone, you’ll know that I like to order out. But am I helping the small local businesses? You would think that if you own a restaurant you’d be thrilled to have an outsourced service that would take care of your delivery operations while leveraging their marketing might to expand your businesses’ brand. However, restaurant owners have complained of lack of quality control once their food goes out the door. They don’t like that the delivery people are the face of their product when it gets into the customer’s hand. Some of the delivery services have been accused of listing restaurants on their apps without the owners’ permission, and oftentimes publish menu items and prices that are incorrect or out of date.

But there is another reason why restaurant owners aren’t fond of delivery services. It’s the costs, which, for some, are becoming unsustainable. Even with the increased revenues from the delivery services, the fees wind up killing a restaurant’s margins to the extent that it’s at best marginally profitable. Therefore, some restaurants are pushing harder to drive orders from their own websites and offering special deals for customers that use their in-house delivery people. The simple fact is that these delivery apps are here to stay. They are enormously popular and have significantly grown. I believe that restaurant owners that resist these apps are hurting their brands by missing out on potential customers. The good news is that the delivery platforms are not as evil as some would portray them. They have some skin in the game. They are competing against other services. They want their listed restaurants to profit. Maybe instead of fighting, the nation’s restaurant industry needs to proactively embrace the delivery service industry and figure out ways to profitably work together.

Em “I believe that restaurant owners that resist these - FUVEST 2022

Inglês - 2022

TEXTO PARA AS QUESTÕES DE 45 A 47

If you take a look at my smartphone, you’ll know that I like to order out. But am I helping the small local businesses? You would think that if you own a restaurant you’d be thrilled to have an outsourced service that would take care of your delivery operations while leveraging their marketing might to expand your businesses’ brand. However, restaurant owners have complained of lack of quality control once their food goes out the door. They don’t like that the delivery people are the face of their product when it gets into the customer’s hand. Some of the delivery services have been accused of listing restaurants on their apps without the owners’ permission, and oftentimes publish menu items and prices that are incorrect or out of date.

But there is another reason why restaurant owners aren’t fond of delivery services. It’s the costs, which, for some, are becoming unsustainable. Even with the increased revenues from the delivery services, the fees wind up killing a restaurant’s margins to the extent that it’s at best marginally profitable. Therefore, some restaurants are pushing harder to drive orders from their own websites and offering special deals for customers that use their in-house delivery people. The simple fact is that these delivery apps are here to stay. They are enormously popular and have significantly grown. I believe that restaurant owners that resist these apps are hurting their brands by missing out on potential customers. The good news is that the delivery platforms are not as evil as some would portray them. They have some skin in the game. They are competing against other services. They want their listed restaurants to profit. Maybe instead of fighting, the nation’s restaurant industry needs to proactively embrace the delivery service industry and figure out ways to profitably work together.

Os versos do poema - Questão de Inglês - FUVEST 2022

Inglês - 2022

Lying, thinking
Last night
How to find my soul a home
Where water is not thirsty
And bread loaf is not stone
I came up with one thing
And I don't believe I'm wrong
That nobody,
But nobody
Can make it out here alone

Considerando os elementos visuais e verbais da figura - FUVEST 2022

Inglês - 2022

Questão 49 - FUVEST 2022

Examine o meme publicado pela comunidade “The - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine o meme publicado pela comunidade “The Language Nerds” em sua conta no Facebook em D07.04.2021.

UNESP 2022

Art which is based on images of mass consumer - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Art which is based on images of mass consumer culture. Pop art was initially regarded as a reaction from abstract expressionism because its exponents brought back figural imagery and made use of impersonal handling. It was seen as a descendant of Dada because it debunked the seriousness of the art world and embraced the use or reproduction of commonplace subjects. Comic books, advertisements, packaging, and images from television and the cinema were all part of the iconography of the movement.

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para responder às questões de 21 a 27.


Educated Americans live longer, as others die younger
_____________________________________________
Catching up, falling behind
Unites States, average life expectancy at age 25

UNESP 2022
Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul
UNESP 2022

(Anne Case and Angus Deaton. “Life expectancy in adulthood is falling for those without a BA degree, but as educational gaps have widened, racial gaps have narrowed”. PNAS, 2021. Adaptado.)

A 25-year-old American with a university degree can expect to live almost a decade longer than a contemporary who dropped out of high school. Although researchers have long known that the rich live longer than the poor, this education gap is less well documented — and is especially marked in rich countries. And whereas the average American’s expected span has been flat in recent years — and, strikingly, even fell between 2015 and 2017 — that of the one-third with a bachelor’s degree has continued to lengthen.
This disparity in life expectancy is growing, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using data from nearly 50m death certificates filed between 1990 and 2018, Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University analysed differences in life expectancy by sex, race, ethnicity and education. They found that the lifespans of those with and without a bachelor’s degree started to diverge in the 1990s and 2000s. This gap grew even wider in the 2010s as the life expectancy of degree-holders continued to rise while that of other Americans got shorter.
What is the link between schooling and longevity? Some argue that better-educated people develop healthier lifestyles: each additional year of study reduces the chances of being a smoker and of being overweight. The better-educated earn more, which in turn is associated with greater health. Ms Case and Mr Deaton argue that changes in labour markets, including the rise of automation and increased demand for highly-educated workers, coupled with the rising costs of employerprovided health care, have depressed the supply of wellpaid jobs for those without a degree. This may be contributing to higher rates of alcohol and drug use, suicide and other “deaths of despair”.

(www.economist.com,17.03.2021. Adaptado.)

As informações apresentadas no primeiro - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para responder às questões de 21 a 27.


Educated Americans live longer, as others die younger
_____________________________________________
Catching up, falling behind
Unites States, average life expectancy at age 25

UNESP 2022
Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul
UNESP 2022

(Anne Case and Angus Deaton. “Life expectancy in adulthood is falling for those without a BA degree, but as educational gaps have widened, racial gaps have narrowed”. PNAS, 2021. Adaptado.)

A 25-year-old American with a university degree can expect to live almost a decade longer than a contemporary who dropped out of high school. Although researchers have long known that the rich live longer than the poor, this education gap is less well documented — and is especially marked in rich countries. And whereas the average American’s expected span has been flat in recent years — and, strikingly, even fell between 2015 and 2017 — that of the one-third with a bachelor’s degree has continued to lengthen.
This disparity in life expectancy is growing, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using data from nearly 50m death certificates filed between 1990 and 2018, Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University analysed differences in life expectancy by sex, race, ethnicity and education. They found that the lifespans of those with and without a bachelor’s degree started to diverge in the 1990s and 2000s. This gap grew even wider in the 2010s as the life expectancy of degree-holders continued to rise while that of other Americans got shorter.
What is the link between schooling and longevity? Some argue that better-educated people develop healthier lifestyles: each additional year of study reduces the chances of being a smoker and of being overweight. The better-educated earn more, which in turn is associated with greater health. Ms Case and Mr Deaton argue that changes in labour markets, including the rise of automation and increased demand for highly-educated workers, coupled with the rising costs of employerprovided health care, have depressed the supply of wellpaid jobs for those without a degree. This may be contributing to higher rates of alcohol and drug use, suicide and other “deaths of despair”.

(www.economist.com,17.03.2021. Adaptado.)

No trecho do primeiro parágrafo “And whereas - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para responder às questões de 21 a 27.


Educated Americans live longer, as others die younger
_____________________________________________
Catching up, falling behind
Unites States, average life expectancy at age 25

UNESP 2022
Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul
UNESP 2022

(Anne Case and Angus Deaton. “Life expectancy in adulthood is falling for those without a BA degree, but as educational gaps have widened, racial gaps have narrowed”. PNAS, 2021. Adaptado.)

A 25-year-old American with a university degree can expect to live almost a decade longer than a contemporary who dropped out of high school. Although researchers have long known that the rich live longer than the poor, this education gap is less well documented — and is especially marked in rich countries. And whereas the average American’s expected span has been flat in recent years — and, strikingly, even fell between 2015 and 2017 — that of the one-third with a bachelor’s degree has continued to lengthen.
This disparity in life expectancy is growing, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using data from nearly 50m death certificates filed between 1990 and 2018, Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University analysed differences in life expectancy by sex, race, ethnicity and education. They found that the lifespans of those with and without a bachelor’s degree started to diverge in the 1990s and 2000s. This gap grew even wider in the 2010s as the life expectancy of degree-holders continued to rise while that of other Americans got shorter.
What is the link between schooling and longevity? Some argue that better-educated people develop healthier lifestyles: each additional year of study reduces the chances of being a smoker and of being overweight. The better-educated earn more, which in turn is associated with greater health. Ms Case and Mr Deaton argue that changes in labour markets, including the rise of automation and increased demand for highly-educated workers, coupled with the rising costs of employerprovided health care, have depressed the supply of wellpaid jobs for those without a degree. This may be contributing to higher rates of alcohol and drug use, suicide and other “deaths of despair”.

(www.economist.com,17.03.2021. Adaptado.)

In the excerpt from the first paragraph “and - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para responder às questões de 21 a 27.


Educated Americans live longer, as others die younger
_____________________________________________
Catching up, falling behind
Unites States, average life expectancy at age 25

UNESP 2022
Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul
UNESP 2022

(Anne Case and Angus Deaton. “Life expectancy in adulthood is falling for those without a BA degree, but as educational gaps have widened, racial gaps have narrowed”. PNAS, 2021. Adaptado.)

A 25-year-old American with a university degree can expect to live almost a decade longer than a contemporary who dropped out of high school. Although researchers have long known that the rich live longer than the poor, this education gap is less well documented — and is especially marked in rich countries. And whereas the average American’s expected span has been flat in recent years — and, strikingly, even fell between 2015 and 2017 — that of the one-third with a bachelor’s degree has continued to lengthen.
This disparity in life expectancy is growing, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using data from nearly 50m death certificates filed between 1990 and 2018, Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University analysed differences in life expectancy by sex, race, ethnicity and education. They found that the lifespans of those with and without a bachelor’s degree started to diverge in the 1990s and 2000s. This gap grew even wider in the 2010s as the life expectancy of degree-holders continued to rise while that of other Americans got shorter.
What is the link between schooling and longevity? Some argue that better-educated people develop healthier lifestyles: each additional year of study reduces the chances of being a smoker and of being overweight. The better-educated earn more, which in turn is associated with greater health. Ms Case and Mr Deaton argue that changes in labour markets, including the rise of automation and increased demand for highly-educated workers, coupled with the rising costs of employerprovided health care, have depressed the supply of wellpaid jobs for those without a degree. This may be contributing to higher rates of alcohol and drug use, suicide and other “deaths of despair”.

(www.economist.com,17.03.2021. Adaptado.)

No trecho do segundo parágrafo “while that of - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para responder às questões de 21 a 27.


Educated Americans live longer, as others die younger
_____________________________________________
Catching up, falling behind
Unites States, average life expectancy at age 25

UNESP 2022
Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul
UNESP 2022

(Anne Case and Angus Deaton. “Life expectancy in adulthood is falling for those without a BA degree, but as educational gaps have widened, racial gaps have narrowed”. PNAS, 2021. Adaptado.)

A 25-year-old American with a university degree can expect to live almost a decade longer than a contemporary who dropped out of high school. Although researchers have long known that the rich live longer than the poor, this education gap is less well documented — and is especially marked in rich countries. And whereas the average American’s expected span has been flat in recent years — and, strikingly, even fell between 2015 and 2017 — that of the one-third with a bachelor’s degree has continued to lengthen.
This disparity in life expectancy is growing, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using data from nearly 50m death certificates filed between 1990 and 2018, Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University analysed differences in life expectancy by sex, race, ethnicity and education. They found that the lifespans of those with and without a bachelor’s degree started to diverge in the 1990s and 2000s. This gap grew even wider in the 2010s as the life expectancy of degree-holders continued to rise while that of other Americans got shorter.
What is the link between schooling and longevity? Some argue that better-educated people develop healthier lifestyles: each additional year of study reduces the chances of being a smoker and of being overweight. The better-educated earn more, which in turn is associated with greater health. Ms Case and Mr Deaton argue that changes in labour markets, including the rise of automation and increased demand for highly-educated workers, coupled with the rising costs of employerprovided health care, have depressed the supply of wellpaid jobs for those without a degree. This may be contributing to higher rates of alcohol and drug use, suicide and other “deaths of despair”.

(www.economist.com,17.03.2021. Adaptado.)

According to the third paragraph, better - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para responder às questões de 21 a 27.


Educated Americans live longer, as others die younger
_____________________________________________
Catching up, falling behind
Unites States, average life expectancy at age 25

UNESP 2022
Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul
UNESP 2022

(Anne Case and Angus Deaton. “Life expectancy in adulthood is falling for those without a BA degree, but as educational gaps have widened, racial gaps have narrowed”. PNAS, 2021. Adaptado.)

A 25-year-old American with a university degree can expect to live almost a decade longer than a contemporary who dropped out of high school. Although researchers have long known that the rich live longer than the poor, this education gap is less well documented — and is especially marked in rich countries. And whereas the average American’s expected span has been flat in recent years — and, strikingly, even fell between 2015 and 2017 — that of the one-third with a bachelor’s degree has continued to lengthen.
This disparity in life expectancy is growing, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using data from nearly 50m death certificates filed between 1990 and 2018, Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University analysed differences in life expectancy by sex, race, ethnicity and education. They found that the lifespans of those with and without a bachelor’s degree started to diverge in the 1990s and 2000s. This gap grew even wider in the 2010s as the life expectancy of degree-holders continued to rise while that of other Americans got shorter.
What is the link between schooling and longevity? Some argue that better-educated people develop healthier lifestyles: each additional year of study reduces the chances of being a smoker and of being overweight. The better-educated earn more, which in turn is associated with greater health. Ms Case and Mr Deaton argue that changes in labour markets, including the rise of automation and increased demand for highly-educated workers, coupled with the rising costs of employerprovided health care, have depressed the supply of wellpaid jobs for those without a degree. This may be contributing to higher rates of alcohol and drug use, suicide and other “deaths of despair”.

(www.economist.com,17.03.2021. Adaptado.)

No trecho do terceiro parágrafo “The better - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os gráficos e leia o texto para responder às questões de 21 a 27.


Educated Americans live longer, as others die younger
_____________________________________________
Catching up, falling behind
Unites States, average life expectancy at age 25

UNESP 2022
Questão 15 - FATEC 2020 - Caderno Azul
UNESP 2022

(Anne Case and Angus Deaton. “Life expectancy in adulthood is falling for those without a BA degree, but as educational gaps have widened, racial gaps have narrowed”. PNAS, 2021. Adaptado.)

A 25-year-old American with a university degree can expect to live almost a decade longer than a contemporary who dropped out of high school. Although researchers have long known that the rich live longer than the poor, this education gap is less well documented — and is especially marked in rich countries. And whereas the average American’s expected span has been flat in recent years — and, strikingly, even fell between 2015 and 2017 — that of the one-third with a bachelor’s degree has continued to lengthen.
This disparity in life expectancy is growing, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Using data from nearly 50m death certificates filed between 1990 and 2018, Anne Case and Angus Deaton of Princeton University analysed differences in life expectancy by sex, race, ethnicity and education. They found that the lifespans of those with and without a bachelor’s degree started to diverge in the 1990s and 2000s. This gap grew even wider in the 2010s as the life expectancy of degree-holders continued to rise while that of other Americans got shorter.
What is the link between schooling and longevity? Some argue that better-educated people develop healthier lifestyles: each additional year of study reduces the chances of being a smoker and of being overweight. The better-educated earn more, which in turn is associated with greater health. Ms Case and Mr Deaton argue that changes in labour markets, including the rise of automation and increased demand for highly-educated workers, coupled with the rising costs of employerprovided health care, have depressed the supply of wellpaid jobs for those without a degree. This may be contributing to higher rates of alcohol and drug use, suicide and other “deaths of despair”.

(www.economist.com,17.03.2021. Adaptado.)

After comparing both maps, one can say that: - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Examine os mapas que apresentam a média de anos de escolaridade para a população de 25 anos ou mais, do ano 2000 e do ano 2017, para responder à questão 28.

UNESP 2022
UNESP 2022

From the comic strip, one can say that - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Leia a tira para responder às questões 29 e 30

UNESP 2022

No trecho do primeiro quadrinho “I guess we - UNESP 2022/Biológicas

Inglês - 2022

Leia a tira para responder às questões 29 e 30

UNESP 2022

A palavra “cringe” viralizou nas redes sociais no - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

A palavra “cringe” viralizou nas redes sociais no Brasil em 2021. Observe sua definição, em português, apontada pelo “Dicionário Informal” on-line:


Vergonha alheia;
Exemplo de uso da palavra cringe:
A cena que presenciamos ontem foi muito cringe.
É cada situação cringe que presenciamos.
Não consigo nem ver, de tão cringe.



Veja, agora, a definição da mesma palavra pelo “Cambridge Dictionary”, também em versão on-line:


to suddenly move away from someone or something because you are frightened

to feel very embarrassed:
I cringed at the sight of my dad dancing.

Em artigo publicado em 14 de junho de 2020, o jornal - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Em artigo publicado em 14 de junho de 2020, o jornal The Straits Times, de Singapura, apresentou os resultados de uma pesquisa sobre a percepção dos respondentes a respeito das profissões mais essenciais durante a pandemia. A imagem a seguir revela algumas estatísticas obtidas com base nessas respostas.

UNICAMP 2022

Em um post em sua rede social, o comediante Rishi Budhrani comentou esses resultados:

UNICAMP 2022

Em 2020, Joaquin Phoenix ganhou o Oscar de melhor ator - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Em 2020, Joaquin Phoenix ganhou o Oscar de melhor ator por sua interpretação no filme “Coringa”, de 2019. Apresenta-se, a seguir, um trecho de seu discurso na ocasião.

UNICAMP 2022

“I think whether we’re talking about gender inequality or racism or queer rights or indigenous rights or animal rights, we’re talking about the fight against injustice. We’re talking about the fight against the belief that one nation, one people, one race, one gender, or one species has the right to dominate, control, and use and exploit another with impunity. I think that we’ve become very disconnected from the natural world, and many of us, what we’re guilty of, is an egocentric worldview: the belief that we’re the center of the universe. We go into the natural world, and we plunder it for its resources. We feel entitled to artificially inseminate a cow, and when she gives birth, we steal her baby even though her cries of anguish are unmistakable. Then we take her milk that’s intended for her calf, and we put it in our coffee and our cereal”.

On a summer night in 1969, police raided the Stonewall - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

UNICAMP 2022

On a summer night in 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a bar in New York City that served as a haven for the city’s gay, lesbian, and transgender community. Back then, homosexual acts were illegal in every state in the USA except Illinois, and bars and restaurants could get shut down for having gay employees or serving gay patrons. Most gay bars in New York at the time (including the Stonewall) were operated by the Mafia, who paid corruptible police officers to look the other way and blackmailed wealthy gay patrons by threatening to “out” them. Police raids on gay bars were common, but on that particular night, members of the city’s LGBTQIA+ community decided to fight back, sparking an uprising that would launch a new era of resistance and revolution. Though the gay rights movement didn’t begin at Stonewall, the uprising did mark a turning point, as earlier “homophile” organizations like the Mattachine Society gave way to more radical groups like the Gay Liberation Front and the Gay Activists Alliance.

There is no evidence that hydroxychloroquine helps - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

There is no evidence that hydroxychloroquine helps Covid-19 patients. So why is Congress still discussing it?

By Ashish Jha
Dean of the Brown University School of Public Health Nov 24, 2020

Last week, in the United States Senate, the conversation was all about the drug hydroxychloroquine. There has been no evidence that hydroxychloroquine improves outcomes for Covid-19 patients; some studies have found that it causes more harm than good. The hearing and the theater around it reflect the disinformation campaigns that have undermined belief in science. Neither Ron Johnson, the Wisconsin senator who is the chairman of the committee, nor his chosen witnesses showed more than a passing interest in evidence. Intuition and the personal experiences of individual doctors were the guiding principles. Early in the pandemic, President Trump referred to hydroxychloroquine as a “game changer”; “I feel good about it”, he said.
That’s not how we practice medicine. We have to protect lives through public health measures while we await widespread vaccinations. By endorsing unfounded therapies, we risk jeopardizing a century’s work of medical progress. Do we really want to go back to not using the best evidence to decide which treatments work? Do we want to let politicians prescribe our medications? Science and evidence are the tools we use to know what is true. They are the foundation of modern medicine and public health.

O trecho a seguir pertence ao romance “The Bell Jar” - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

O trecho a seguir pertence ao romance “The Bell Jar” (A Redoma de Vidro), da escritora estadunidense Sylvia Plath.

“From the tip of every branch, like a fat purple fig, a wonderful future beckoned and winked. One fig was a husband and a happy home and children, and another fig was a famous poet and another fig was a brilliant professor, (…) and beyond and above these figs were many more figs I couldn't quite make out. (…) I wanted each and every one of them, but choosing one meant losing all the rest, and, as I sat there, unable to decide, the figs began to wrinkle and go black, and, one by one, they plopped to the ground at my feet.”

Gaslighting is a form of psychological abuse where a - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

UNICAMP 2022

Gaslighting is a form of psychological abuse where a person or group makes someone question their sanity, perception of reality, or memories. People experiencing gaslighting often feel confused, anxious, and unable to trust themselves. The term gaslighting derives from the 1938 play and 1944 film “Gaslight”, in which a husband manipulates his wife into thinking she has a mental illness by dimming their gasfueled lights and telling her she is hallucinating. While anyone can experience gaslighting, it is especially common in intimate relationships and in social interactions where there is an imbalance of power. A person who is on the receiving end of this behavior is experiencing abuse.

A poeta e ativista palestina Rafeef Ziadah estava - UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

A poeta e ativista palestina Rafeef Ziadah estava participando da cobertura jornalística do massacre em Gaza quando um jornalista não-palestino perguntou-lhe se as coisas não seriam melhores se os palestinos parassem de ensinar o ódio às suas crianças. Em resposta a essa pergunta, Ziadah compôs o poema “We teach life, sir”, transcrito a seguir:


Today, my body was a TV’d massacre
that had to fit into sound-bites and word limits.
And I perfected my English and I learned my UN resolutions.
But still, he asked me, Ms. Ziadah, don’t you think that everything would be resolved
if you would just stop teaching so much hatred to your children?
Pause.
I look inside of me for strength to be patient
but patience is not at the tip of my tongue as the bombs drop over Gaza.
Today, my body was a TV’d massacre made to fit into soundbites and word limits
and move those that are desensitized to terrorist blood.
And these are not two equal sides: occupier and occupied.
And a hundred dead, two hundred dead, and a thousand dead.
And between that, war crime, and massacre,
I vent out words and smile “not exotic”, “not terrorist”.
No sound-bite will fix this.
We teach life, sir.

A rainha Nzinga (1624-1663), governante seiscentista do -UNICAMP 2022

Inglês - 2022

A rainha Nzinga (1624-1663), governante seiscentista do Ndongo, um reino da África Central situado na atual Angola, chegou ao poder graças à sua competência militar, à diplomacia bem sucedida, à manipulação da religião e de conflitos entre potências europeias. Ela criou as condições para a primeira sublevação popular mbundu contra a exploração portuguesa ao atrair para sua causa os chefes que estavam sob influência europeia. Depois conquistou o reino vizinho de Matamba e o governou por três décadas junto com o que restou do poderoso reino Ndongo; desafiou treze governadores portugueses que regeram Angola entre 1622 e 1633. Apesar de seus feitos e o longo reinado, comparável ao de Elizabeth I (1503–1603) da Inglaterra, ela foi desacreditada pelos contemporâneos europeus e por autores posteriores.

According to the text, the study highlights a) the - FAMERP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 17.

FAMERP 2022

You may want to skip the toppings on your next hot dog, or skip it altogether: Health researchers at the University of Michigan have found that eating a single hot dog could take 36 minutes off your life. In their study, researchers looked at 5,853 foods in the US diet and measured their effects in minutes of healthy life gained or lost. “We wanted to make a health-based evaluation of the beneficial and detrimental impacts of the food in the entire diet,” Olivier Jolliet, professor of environmental health sciences at the university and senior author of the paper, told CNN.
The team came up with an index that calculates the net beneficial or detrimental health burden in minutes of healthy life associated with a serving of food. It’s based on a study called the Global Burden of Disease, which measures morbidity associated with a person’s food choices. “For example, 0.45 minutes are lost per gram of processed meat, or 0.1 minutes are gained per gram of fruit. We then look at the composition of each food and then multiplied this number by the corresponding food profiles that we previously developed,” said the professor.
One of the foods researchers measured was a standard beef hot dog on a bun. Its 61 grams of processed meat resulted in the loss of 27 minutes of healthy life, Jolliet said — but when ingredients like sodium and trans fatty acids were factored in, the final value was 36 minutes lost. Consumption of foods such as nuts, legumes, seafood, fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, on the other hand, have positive effects on health, the study found. “The index is primarily there to help aid in selecting and using calories consumed on a daily basis to tweak a minimum of habits and make the minimum of change to obtain a maximum benefit for health and the environment from our food experience,” Jolliet said.

(Lauren M. Johnson. https://edition.cnn.com, 27.08.2021. Adaptado.)

No trecho do primeiro parágrafo “a single hot dog could - FAMERP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 17.

FAMERP 2022

You may want to skip the toppings on your next hot dog, or skip it altogether: Health researchers at the University of Michigan have found that eating a single hot dog could take 36 minutes off your life. In their study, researchers looked at 5,853 foods in the US diet and measured their effects in minutes of healthy life gained or lost. “We wanted to make a health-based evaluation of the beneficial and detrimental impacts of the food in the entire diet,” Olivier Jolliet, professor of environmental health sciences at the university and senior author of the paper, told CNN.
The team came up with an index that calculates the net beneficial or detrimental health burden in minutes of healthy life associated with a serving of food. It’s based on a study called the Global Burden of Disease, which measures morbidity associated with a person’s food choices. “For example, 0.45 minutes are lost per gram of processed meat, or 0.1 minutes are gained per gram of fruit. We then look at the composition of each food and then multiplied this number by the corresponding food profiles that we previously developed,” said the professor.
One of the foods researchers measured was a standard beef hot dog on a bun. Its 61 grams of processed meat resulted in the loss of 27 minutes of healthy life, Jolliet said — but when ingredients like sodium and trans fatty acids were factored in, the final value was 36 minutes lost. Consumption of foods such as nuts, legumes, seafood, fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, on the other hand, have positive effects on health, the study found. “The index is primarily there to help aid in selecting and using calories consumed on a daily basis to tweak a minimum of habits and make the minimum of change to obtain a maximum benefit for health and the environment from our food experience,” Jolliet said.

(Lauren M. Johnson. https://edition.cnn.com, 27.08.2021. Adaptado.)

In the excerpt from the second paragraph “which measures - FAMERP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 17.

FAMERP 2022

You may want to skip the toppings on your next hot dog, or skip it altogether: Health researchers at the University of Michigan have found that eating a single hot dog could take 36 minutes off your life. In their study, researchers looked at 5,853 foods in the US diet and measured their effects in minutes of healthy life gained or lost. “We wanted to make a health-based evaluation of the beneficial and detrimental impacts of the food in the entire diet,” Olivier Jolliet, professor of environmental health sciences at the university and senior author of the paper, told CNN.
The team came up with an index that calculates the net beneficial or detrimental health burden in minutes of healthy life associated with a serving of food. It’s based on a study called the Global Burden of Disease, which measures morbidity associated with a person’s food choices. “For example, 0.45 minutes are lost per gram of processed meat, or 0.1 minutes are gained per gram of fruit. We then look at the composition of each food and then multiplied this number by the corresponding food profiles that we previously developed,” said the professor.
One of the foods researchers measured was a standard beef hot dog on a bun. Its 61 grams of processed meat resulted in the loss of 27 minutes of healthy life, Jolliet said — but when ingredients like sodium and trans fatty acids were factored in, the final value was 36 minutes lost. Consumption of foods such as nuts, legumes, seafood, fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, on the other hand, have positive effects on health, the study found. “The index is primarily there to help aid in selecting and using calories consumed on a daily basis to tweak a minimum of habits and make the minimum of change to obtain a maximum benefit for health and the environment from our food experience,” Jolliet said.

(Lauren M. Johnson. https://edition.cnn.com, 27.08.2021. Adaptado.)

No trecho do segundo parágrafo “For example, 0.45 - FAMERP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 17.

FAMERP 2022

You may want to skip the toppings on your next hot dog, or skip it altogether: Health researchers at the University of Michigan have found that eating a single hot dog could take 36 minutes off your life. In their study, researchers looked at 5,853 foods in the US diet and measured their effects in minutes of healthy life gained or lost. “We wanted to make a health-based evaluation of the beneficial and detrimental impacts of the food in the entire diet,” Olivier Jolliet, professor of environmental health sciences at the university and senior author of the paper, told CNN.
The team came up with an index that calculates the net beneficial or detrimental health burden in minutes of healthy life associated with a serving of food. It’s based on a study called the Global Burden of Disease, which measures morbidity associated with a person’s food choices. “For example, 0.45 minutes are lost per gram of processed meat, or 0.1 minutes are gained per gram of fruit. We then look at the composition of each food and then multiplied this number by the corresponding food profiles that we previously developed,” said the professor.
One of the foods researchers measured was a standard beef hot dog on a bun. Its 61 grams of processed meat resulted in the loss of 27 minutes of healthy life, Jolliet said — but when ingredients like sodium and trans fatty acids were factored in, the final value was 36 minutes lost. Consumption of foods such as nuts, legumes, seafood, fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, on the other hand, have positive effects on health, the study found. “The index is primarily there to help aid in selecting and using calories consumed on a daily basis to tweak a minimum of habits and make the minimum of change to obtain a maximum benefit for health and the environment from our food experience,” Jolliet said.

(Lauren M. Johnson. https://edition.cnn.com, 27.08.2021. Adaptado.)

No trecho do segundo parágrafo “We then look at the - FAMERP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 17.

FAMERP 2022

You may want to skip the toppings on your next hot dog, or skip it altogether: Health researchers at the University of Michigan have found that eating a single hot dog could take 36 minutes off your life. In their study, researchers looked at 5,853 foods in the US diet and measured their effects in minutes of healthy life gained or lost. “We wanted to make a health-based evaluation of the beneficial and detrimental impacts of the food in the entire diet,” Olivier Jolliet, professor of environmental health sciences at the university and senior author of the paper, told CNN.
The team came up with an index that calculates the net beneficial or detrimental health burden in minutes of healthy life associated with a serving of food. It’s based on a study called the Global Burden of Disease, which measures morbidity associated with a person’s food choices. “For example, 0.45 minutes are lost per gram of processed meat, or 0.1 minutes are gained per gram of fruit. We then look at the composition of each food and then multiplied this number by the corresponding food profiles that we previously developed,” said the professor.
One of the foods researchers measured was a standard beef hot dog on a bun. Its 61 grams of processed meat resulted in the loss of 27 minutes of healthy life, Jolliet said — but when ingredients like sodium and trans fatty acids were factored in, the final value was 36 minutes lost. Consumption of foods such as nuts, legumes, seafood, fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, on the other hand, have positive effects on health, the study found. “The index is primarily there to help aid in selecting and using calories consumed on a daily basis to tweak a minimum of habits and make the minimum of change to obtain a maximum benefit for health and the environment from our food experience,” Jolliet said.

(Lauren M. Johnson. https://edition.cnn.com, 27.08.2021. Adaptado.)

No contexto em que se insere, um trecho que expressa - FAMERP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 17.

FAMERP 2022

You may want to skip the toppings on your next hot dog, or skip it altogether: Health researchers at the University of Michigan have found that eating a single hot dog could take 36 minutes off your life. In their study, researchers looked at 5,853 foods in the US diet and measured their effects in minutes of healthy life gained or lost. “We wanted to make a health-based evaluation of the beneficial and detrimental impacts of the food in the entire diet,” Olivier Jolliet, professor of environmental health sciences at the university and senior author of the paper, told CNN.
The team came up with an index that calculates the net beneficial or detrimental health burden in minutes of healthy life associated with a serving of food. It’s based on a study called the Global Burden of Disease, which measures morbidity associated with a person’s food choices. “For example, 0.45 minutes are lost per gram of processed meat, or 0.1 minutes are gained per gram of fruit. We then look at the composition of each food and then multiplied this number by the corresponding food profiles that we previously developed,” said the professor.
One of the foods researchers measured was a standard beef hot dog on a bun. Its 61 grams of processed meat resulted in the loss of 27 minutes of healthy life, Jolliet said — but when ingredients like sodium and trans fatty acids were factored in, the final value was 36 minutes lost. Consumption of foods such as nuts, legumes, seafood, fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, on the other hand, have positive effects on health, the study found. “The index is primarily there to help aid in selecting and using calories consumed on a daily basis to tweak a minimum of habits and make the minimum of change to obtain a maximum benefit for health and the environment from our food experience,” Jolliet said.

(Lauren M. Johnson. https://edition.cnn.com, 27.08.2021. Adaptado.)

In the excerpt from the third paragraph “The index - FAMERP 2022

Inglês - 2022

Leia o texto para responder às questões de 11 a 17.

FAMERP 2022

You may want to skip the toppings on your next hot dog, or skip it altogether: Health researchers at the University of Michigan have found that eating a single hot dog could take 36 minutes off your life. In their study, researchers looked at 5,853 foods in the US diet and measured their effects in minutes of healthy life gained or lost. “We wanted to make a health-based evaluation of the beneficial and detrimental impacts of the food in the entire diet,” Olivier Jolliet, professor of environmental health sciences at the university and senior author of the paper, told CNN.
The team came up with an index that calculates the net beneficial or detrimental health burden in minutes of healthy life associated with a serving of food. It’s based on a study called the Global Burden of Disease, which measures morbidity associated with a person’s food choices. “For example, 0.45 minutes are lost per gram of processed meat, or 0.1 minutes are gained per gram of fruit. We then look at the composition of each food and then multiplied this number by the corresponding food profiles that we previously developed,” said the professor.
One of the foods researchers measured was a standard beef hot dog on a bun. Its 61 grams of processed meat resulted in the loss of 27 minutes of healthy life, Jolliet said — but when ingredients like sodium and trans fatty acids were factored in, the final value was 36 minutes lost. Consumption of foods such as nuts, legumes, seafood, fruits and nonstarchy vegetables, on the other hand, have positive effects on health, the study found. “The index is primarily there to help aid in selecting and using calories consumed on a daily basis to tweak a minimum of habits and make the minimum of change to obtain a maximum benefit for health and the environment from our food experience,” Jolliet said.

(Lauren M. Johnson. https://edition.cnn.com, 27.08.2021. Adaptado.)

As informações apresentadas pelo infográfico constituem - FAMERP 2022

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Leia o infográfico para responder às questões 18 e 19.

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As falas do homem de azul podem ser associadas ao - FAMERP 2022

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